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  5. "Ubi panem emis?"

"Ubi panem emis?"

Translation:Where do you buy bread?

August 31, 2019

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdblake93

This would be such a useful phrase if we time traveled back to ancient Rome!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Schlepper2

What is the Infinitive of "emis"? Emere?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Can this be used as a general question ("Where does one buy bread?") like it can in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qwynneth662

Not really. It addresses a secondary person through the -s ending in emere. What you ask for is more like "Ubi panem ad emendo." if I'm having my Latin correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kas334864

I'd stick to passive: ubi emitur panis?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In French too, you can use "tu" or "vous" as a general "one".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

Though it's more usual to use "on", isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AilawilHathaway

Not really. Not in today's French, anyway. "On" has taken the place of "nous" in every day spoken French. But then again, we sometimes use "we" to mean "one." Where do we buy bread? and Where does one buy bread? mean roughly the same thing: You want to buy bread, and you want to know where to go.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christos970882

If it read instead "where from do you buy bread", would it translate as "unde panem emis"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaakthecutestdog

let alone the latin "where from do you buy bread" is not Grammarly correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

What is grammatically correct in one language is not necessarily correct in another.

If we are trying to break down a latin phrase, we have to translate each piece to its equivalent in english.

When we do that, we don't care about what is correct in english.

We're just trying to understand what the latin is actually saying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DexterAndre

What is the difference between "ubi" and "quo" when asking a question about locations?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

ubi -> 'where', static (no movement). "Where are we?", "Where are my keys?"

quo -> 'where to', movement towards. "Where are you going (to)?" Or "To where are you going?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GunnarRica

Then unde -> 'where from,' movement away. Correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Yes, unde is 'where from', movement away.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenjaminTi986945

"Ubi panem amis" was accepted 20191206 lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/berjfjakdi

I accidentally translated into English :( forgot you had to write the latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

What about ‘where do you get bread from’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

That would be Unde panem impetras/impetratis?, if I am not wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonRusht1

I assume the 'buy' is needed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mafatu

Could "Where can you buy bread?" also be a correct translation. This would be closer to what someone would actually say in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Really? I am not a native speaker of English, but I think "Where do you buy bread?" and "Where can you buy bread?" do not mean the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

It means the exact same thing to an american speaker asking the question.

The questions are interchangeable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tankenbahwl

where can you buy bread = where is bread available right now?/ which bakery has not run out of bread?/ what is the location of some bread currently?

where do you buy bread = what is a building/establishment that normally sells bread?/ where is bread made for exchange to the public for money?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Redko.

'Where would you buy bread' should also be an acceptable translation, especially since would is one of the selectable words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

Wouldn't that require subjunctive, though?

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