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  5. "I come from California."

"I come from California."

Translation:Ego a California venio.

August 31, 2019

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tom0153

I'm having trouble distinguishing when to use a or ab.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanamTraho

Use “ab” before anything that starts with a vowel or h. Use “a” before a word that starts with any other consonant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucretius6

Is "h" silent after "ab"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiteraryRomantic

The "ego" can and would usually be omitted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tristam212765

Why is "California venio" not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

It's missing "from"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonathanDe987383

It taught me "California venio" before, but now doesn't accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloChen2

Are you sure the noun was "California"? There are nouns that can take a bare "ablative of place from which" without needing a preposition, but those nouns all have a distinct locative form.

  • "Romā veniō" -- "I come from Rome"

  • "Romae dormiō" -- "I sleep in Rome"

  • "A Californiā veniō" -- "I come from California"

  • "In Californiā dormiō" -- "I sleep in California"

California is not a city, town or small island. It's way too big to take a locative.

Besides the names of cities, towns and small islands, there are a few other nouns for which the locative survives into the Classical period, mostly cozy nouns such as domus (home), rūs (estate), and focus (hearth).

ablative locative
domus domū / -ō domī
rūs rūre rūrī
focus focō focī

https://latin.cactus2000.de/noun/shownoun_en.php?n=domus (domī)

https://latin.cactus2000.de/noun/shownoun_en.php?n=rus (rūrī)

https://enacademic.com/dic.nsf/enwiki/44617 (focī)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VBTQRK

Why oh why couldn't this be "ab Aegyptus", or "a Britannia", or any other historically plausible location.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freddicat

Totally, the "ego" is not needed. Just as in previous examples, "You" and "Tu" were not needed. The pronoun is implicit in the verb conjugation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's a way to teach us pronouns. As in Spanish and Italian, they are optional and emphatic.
Please, report when a sentence is not accepted with a pronoun, or is not accepted because of the lack of a pronoun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

Except when the stress is on the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

FInally, a phrase especially for me !! I'm even Native as in Native American California Indian, Ohlone ! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caroline-G.

I'm from the Powhatan tribe. But I'm also Californian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanamTraho

I would think that in the context of place origins, “de” would be used rather than “a/ab.”

If I am coming home from vacation in California I’d say venio a California “I am coming from CA.” But if I’m away at college and telling my roommate where I come from, I’d say venio de California “I come from CA.”

Ultimately, what I’m trying to say is that if you use “a/ab,” I think a progressive translation would work better in English: “I am coming from California.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

No citation...?

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