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  5. "Livia feels poorly."

"Livia feels poorly."

Translation:Livia se male habet.

September 1, 2019

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.Asmo

"Se" connects to some verbs, it is an equivalent of "herself" (in this sentence). "Se" is a reflexive pronoun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zahrim22

Its easier to understand in german xD (i mean it for real)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zahrim22

If u dont speak german i should show a example

Lat: Livia se male habet

Eng: Livia feels poorly

Ger: Livia fühlt sich schlecht


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fovulonkiin

Oh wow, that actually helps, danke! :]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidRezende

In Swedish and Portuguese too!

Swe: Livia känner sig dåligt

Por: Lívia se sente mal


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

It's not that hard to understand in English. It's a direct object pronoun that here is acting reflexively. It's literally "Livia keeps herself poorly."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariyam959805

Difference between habet and habes, habitatis, habeo, habito etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomas.pyle

Conjugation based off number and person. Habeo is first person singular, haves is second singular, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dyprosopon

I'm also curious. I know Habeo = I but I feel dumb trying to define the others so shorthandedly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

The verb "habeo" is to have, and the verb "habito" is to live or reside somewhere. Both verbs follow the typical conjugation of:

  • (ego) habeo/habito
  • (tu) habes/habitas
  • (is/ea/id) habet/habitat
  • (nos) habemus/habitamus
  • (vos) habetis/habitatis
  • (ei/eae/ea) habent/habitant

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:habere [to hold]
http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/verb:habitare [to dwell]

The pattern you'll find with all regular verbs and many irregular verbs is this:

person suffix
1s -o
2s -s
3s -t
1p -mus
2p -tis
3p -nt

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SineNmine

Livia male se habet, is correct too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/montyjoham

I am trying to think with Spanish. Livia se siente mal. The reflexive has been drilled into me with Duolingo Spanish. I wonder if a literal translation would be: "Livia has it bad." But that doesn't work in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

No, it's literally "Livia has/holds herself badly."

The Spanish is literally "Livia feels herself bad."

The reflexive is needed in both because otherwise what is she holding? What is she feeling?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

What is the literal word for "feel" in Latin? Sentire?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

Google Translate is abysmal for translating phrases and sentences, but it's okay for individual words. I translated "feel" into Latin and got these results. It would seem that the appropriate sense of "feel" here is "sentio, sentire".

Verb

sentio
feel, perceive, think, experience, judge, declare
percipio
feel, perceive, receive, grasp, reap from, gain
contracto
touch, feel, handle
tago
poke, disquiet, abut, eat, seize, feel
pertrecto
feel, fondle, handle, study, investigate
tento
test, try, assay, endeavor, allure, feel
persentisco
feel, conceive, perceive
tempto
try, test, attempt, tempt, essay, feel
persentio
feel, conceive, perceive
pertracto
investigate, handle, fondle, feel, study
tango
touch, feel, touch on, touch upon, strike, affect
taxo
condemn, touch, blame, estimate, value, feel
contrecto
handle, touch, feel

Noun

tactio
feeling, touch, feel
tactus
touch, sense of touch, feeling, influence, feel


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dominic70886

Is “se” only used with women or female names or feminine ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattSchoon

"me"= 1st person reflexive "te"= 2nd person reflexive "se"= 3rd person reflexive Latin reflexives don't have gender. I was looking for somewhere to post this. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleNotMaxim

That actually helped me loads, thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

"Se" is the 3rd person singular reflexive, irrespective of gender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

If I understand correctly, is the "se" like the English reflexive (her/my/his)-self?

So, literally, Livia-self feels poorly.

Livia se male habet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

Literally, "Livia holds/has herself poorly."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rumbleinyerbum

Would "Livia se habet male" work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

I think so, but that would not be a very common usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanRoe3

Can 'se' be omitted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

No. It's literally "Livia holds herself poorly". Livia male se habet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thomasabeyer

The translation should be "Livia feels poor/bad" not "poorly." To "feel poorly/badly" means you're bad at feeling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

To feel poorly is correct and common in British English and means you don't feel good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshua.gra2

It is the same in my American dialect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChubbyDragon

The listed translation is completely different than what it told me was the correct answer. Does anyone know why it corrected me with "Livia male agit"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2617

It would help to know what your answer was.

"Livia male agit" translates into English equivalently with "Livia se male habet."

Literally, "Livia male agit" is "Livia is doing poorly" and "Livia se male habet" is "Livia has/holds herself poorly."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felix839568

Thank you, even this one-year-old answer remains relevant. Duolingo recognized my answer but noted my sentence structure as incorrect. The Latin sentence structure is very weird to me, so I needed to find someone else to clarify this for me for future Latin lessons. So, thank you for clarifying my confusion.

Knowing Latin helps me better understand Spanish and French, and possibly some oddball mathematics references....proofs are riddles with latin in my textbooks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoonwatchertheNW

it took me a while but i kind of realised that the se kind of makes it more of a sentance. like instead of saying Corinna feels poorly it would be Corinna is feeling poorly. it's kind of like an aditional is just for the word feeling. like instead of saying Corinna feels poorly it's like, Corinna has the bad feeling. i don't know if that makes sense to anyone but i hope it helps! :)

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