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  5. "Mustelae coquere non solent."

"Mustelae coquere non solent."

Translation:Weasels do not usually cook.

September 1, 2019

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alessia120502

The cows from the spanish course could teach them...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

Weasels prefer fresh blood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daguipa

This construction is probably easier for Spanish speakers to understand. Spanish and Catalan are the only Romance languages (as far as I know) that have kept the verb "solere" meaning "doing something on a regular basis". The Latin sentence would be "Las comadrejas no suelen cocinar" in Spanish.

EDIT: Also Italian has the verb "solere". You live and learn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tibfulv

English uses the use verb in the imperfect to express a similar thing. It used to be a general thing, but is no longer. And Norwegian, too has got a bruke verb that is used for that. Interestingly, it also means use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daguipa

Yes, but English does it just in the past tense, not in the present, like the Spanish "soler". By the way, I have to correct myself: Italian has the verb "solere" as well, not only Spanish and Catalan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wisdom_of_words

There is also the verb "soer" in Portuguese. It is a defective verb (with an incomplete conjugation). E. g.: Como sói acontecer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I think it's rather a past participle, than a past (so, becoming like an adjective, describing a state: to be...ed).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karin436332

The verb 'bruka' in Swedish means exactly to do something on a regular basis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guntunge

German uses the past participle of wohnen (to live/reside probably some connection to the noun wont) - gewohnt like English does with use. I don't think the logic is super foreign or special. At least I think I don't miss some magic of this solent/suelen.

Wiesel kochen gewöhnlich nicht. Weasel do not usually cook.
Wiesel sind nicht gewohnt zu kochen. Weasel are not used to cook.
I guess the meaning is more accurate transferred in the second version but I can't describe to myself why it feels somewhat different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeefTestos4

But when they do, they cook great.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonGilli14

Them's good eatin'!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasClarke9

But when they do, it's roasted parrots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

et psittaci carmina scribere non solent,

sed nihil sub sole novum...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdblake93

"Weasels usually don't cook." was marked as incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

Report it. It should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ladynadiad

If someone can find me a weasel that cooks I'd be glad to have it as a pet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OzXDkf

They cook occasionally...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stivusik

At aliquid vini eis potare licebit, coquent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardHen85991

Surprised it's not the parrots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leafwhite

Does any weasel cook??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Percy-Vered

Apparently some do xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLandingEagle

Right, usually when I finally trap Dirty weasels I throw them away, not cook them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spookpadda

I’m intrigued that a sentence about weasels cooking makes sense in Catalan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bio2020

How could I say "We usually dont cook weasels"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Mustelas coquere non solemus."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkK140481

Much to the ire of the drunken Parrots


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fernando644713

They prefer to buy food made.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BraveSamodiva

Only on special occasions


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The_Commando7

Not usually, though there are a few exceptions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeilCross2

This is undoubtedly true.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveSwart1

So it's not just the parrots who are drunk!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllenY99

Mustelae seems to have been pronounced with two syllables in ae which is... at best, odd?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LingotLover1

Weasels don't, but rats can!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Insane_Reader

Can someone exlpain why we use the verb "to cook" instead of just "cook?" is it because "usually" comes first? This wasn't explained to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristineM727245

Why is 'solent' placed at the end of the sentence? Where can I expect to find the answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristineM727245

Usually is an adverb in English. There is a verb to use. eg I have used all the butter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

Why is 'solent' placed at the end of the sentence?

The conjugated verb typically goes to the end of the sentence in Latin.

Usually is an adverb in English.

I'm not quite sure what you mean here. "Solent" is a verb in Latin; in particular it is an auxiliary verb like "can" or "should" in English and so usually goes with a second verb ("can go"; "should eat"). We don't have a verb in English that has the same meaning, so we have to approximate it with other words; roughly "soleo" means "to be used to [doing something]" or "usually [do something]."

There is a verb to use. eg I have used all the butter.

"Soleo" means to "be used to [doing something]," not to use something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katy127130

Could "solent" be translated as "tend", as in "Weasels do not tend to cook."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Percy-Vered

I think it could be translated as that, but I don't think it would be accepted here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Percy-Vered

So... sometimes they DO cook?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/queenofshred

But when they do cook, they rapidly destroy the building with fire (or is that just the drunk parrots?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xulius2

So they cook sometimes

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