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  5. "Marcus caseum valde olet."

"Marcus caseum valde olet."

Translation:Marcus smells greatly of cheese.

September 1, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnubius

Sounded like "caseu" to me. I guess thats part of Latin elision? Either way it doesn't help beginners in a beta course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dxrsam

um becomes a nasalized vowel ũ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TitiLaCarotte

Smells greatly of cheese...? What does that mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erin191214

It means he absolutely reeks of cheese. There is no Marcus. Only cheese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/virpacalis

I tried stinks instead of smells; this was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.cle.

Sounds like an odd compliment ^^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdblake93

Wouldn't 'cāseī' (singular genitive) here be correct instead of the singular accusative 'cāseum'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pedro177810

It sounds 'caseo' instead of 'caseum'...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PsittacumEbrium

Why do "a lot" is not accepted ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarryLord1

It should be accepted. To say "greatly" sounds pompous here, in modern English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franz460815

Fortasse non invenit labrum et saponem?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t20f7gYt

Caseum is accusative so Marcus smells the cheese not of cheese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t20f7gYt

My mistake. Olet takes the accusative not only in the sense of 'to smell something', but also in the sense of 'to smell of something'.

So 'Marcus caseum olet' can mean either 'Marcus smells cheese' or 'Marcus smells of cheese'. However in the above case with 'valde', I guess 'of cheese' makes the most sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagisterFraz

I believe that "olet" can only mean "smell of," and it can take the accusative or ablative case of the thing.

To "smell something" is usually "olfacit".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Honcongensis

Yes, olfacio' (orolefacio') is used if you mean detect something by smell' .Oleo' normally takes the accusative (as in the lesson's sentence) but, according to Lewis and Short,, the ablative is also possible, so `Marcus caseo olet' should not be marked wrong and, to my ears, that is what the speaker is actually saying!

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