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  5. "Pater eorum est senilis."

"Pater eorum est senilis."

Translation:Their father is aged.

September 1, 2019

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"Old" is now accepted (tested right now).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taramitzy

Not accepted 14/04


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

"Their father is old" -> Pater eorum est vetus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arturo.belano

aged adjective 1 | ājd | [predicative or postpositive] having lived for a specified length of time; of a specified age: young people aged 14 to 18 | he died aged 60. • (of a horse or farm animal) over a certain defined age of maturity, typically 6 to 12 years for horses, 3 or 4 years for cattle. 2 | ˈājəd | having lived or existed for a long time; old

"Old" is one of the definitions of aged.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stivusik

"Aged" is a very marked word in contemporary English. And "senilis" is pretty marked in Latin, too. Please note that the PHI doesn't give a single example of senilis referring to a person (Servius uses it once of animals). Pater eorum est senex is how to express this idea in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gigach

Explain to me why they aren't synonyms exactly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/water_color

Is there really such a difference between old and aged so I can't use "old" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MusicMan82

"Eorum" is the 3rd person plural dative pronoun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Eorum is not dative, but genitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osm6w

Oh, so the suffix is "-orum" not "-um"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adohall

My feeling is you'd hear 'aging' much more often than 'aged' in this context. A wine is aged. A person is aging.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllieSwell

you haven't met my mother


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrozenTundraFoxy

Senile and senecense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrettWettlaufer

"Their father is old" is a fine answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's now accepted. It takes some times and patience, as you see.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ischarbach

Is eorum a genitive plural of some sort?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LGFreeRock0828

Yes. It's genitive plural of "is," which translate to "he."

This link has the declension tables:

https://www.online-latin-dictionary.com/latin-dictionary-flexion.php?lemma=IS100


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim869817

Does this mean only "they" as a group of males, or could eorum mean a mix of males and females?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

Good question. I think eōrum serves for both females and males, as the word can be both masculine and neuter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bikejackel

Yes I can see on the wiktionary tables that eorum is genitive I just don't understand why or how? Can anyone explain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

Because it's their/his father and not t(he) father. The father belongs to them (the male ones in this case; eōrum).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariane954911

Does the declension of adjectives ("senilis" in this case) work just like the nouns? Can we follow the same boards?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/healthymentor

"Their father is aged" sounds terrible. Who says this? Their father has aged or their father is old are much better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

I have heard it worded this way in extremely polite and respectful company.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnssiAatam

Why is the word order "pater eorum" and not "eorum pater"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve83777

Why is pater eorum senilis est marked wrong?

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