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  5. "Marcus librum scribit."

"Marcus librum scribit."

Translation:Marcus writes a book.

September 1, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SikkhapatG

what is the difference between liber and librum?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Liber is the nominative case, while librum is the accusative case.

The nominative being used for the subject of the sentence. The person or thing 'doing' the action. Here, Marcus is in the nominative.

The accusative being the direct object of the sentence. The person or thing being 'acted' upon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannedMan

Also note the difference between liber, librī and līber, līberī, the first meaning ‘book’ and the second ‘free’ (thus also used meaning ‘children’). It is incorrectly pronounced in this audio clip.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CalebChoo1

I really don’t like to male voice reading out latin, the American accent is too strong and there are mispronunciations everywhere. The female voice is so much better!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/debbbv

I think I'm getting headache. It's getting harder..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Márcus librum scríbit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarperNico

Shouldn't it be, "Marcus is writing a book?" Or, maybe, "Marcus writes books?" "Marcus writes a book," does not make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

'Writes books' is incorrect because it's a singular form of the word, but 'is writing' is an accepted translation. 'Marcus writes the book' also works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarperNico

Yeah, that makes sense. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaHopTeixeira

For me, a Portuguese speaker, it's easy lear Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bossmeggan

Can someone explain why the -um ending for liber?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The -um of librum puts liber into the accusative case. The accusative being the direct object of the sentence. The person or thing being 'acted' upon.

Liber is used when it is the subject of the sentence, the doer of the action.

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