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"Discipulae semper latinae linguae student."

Translation:The students always study the Latin language.

September 1, 2019

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BMC
  • 314

Should "The students always study Latin," not be acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Windrammer

If you think it should, report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

It's accepted now, 2/22/2020.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cmetzner

is it possible to say linguae latinae instead of latinae linguae? This was my answer, DL said it is wrong: "Discipulae semper linguae latinae student"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erkte
  • 2503

Studeo requires the dative when it means to support, to encourage. Otherwise it's transitive. https://www.online-latin-dictionary.com/latin-english-dictionary.php?parola=Studeo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BjarteMo

In that case, why is the phrase given 'latinae linguae' and not 'latinam linguam'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrSarr

The verb "studeo" raquires the dative case. Both the noun "lingua" and the adjective "latina" belong to the first declension. So in dative case you would say linguae latinae or latinae linguae. For instance, linguae latinae studeo.

Other verbes require the causative case, e.g "disco". Linguam latinam disco.

I hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BjarteMo

All right, it just seemed from the previous post and the linked dictionary entry that it only took the dative case when the meaning 'to encourage' or 'to support' applied, and not in the meaning expressed in the above phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

I am always a little weary of sites like the one that was linked in that comment. The idioms, examples and such at the bottom of the link in the comment are mostly with the dative from what I saw. Maybe that dictionary is using the convention some books I have seen do, where verbs that take the dative have definitions with 'to' or 'for' at the end. Maybe the usage of the accusative became more common post classical Latin, the usage to mean 'to study' seems more common in later Latin. The site also has an entry for studeor, a passive of studeo, but I don't think I have ever seen a passive form of studeo before.

Every book I have that I could find that mentions studeo, studere (Wheelock's, Pocket OLD, LLPSI) states it is used with the dative (in general, not for some meanings instead of others). I have most often seen it described as usually taking the dative.

For a more nuanced explanation I looked at Lewis and Short briefly. Based on Lewis and Short it can occur with just an accusative, but this is said to be rare and usually is a pronoun or an adjective. They give that it is frequent to see an infinitive with an accusative. They also state that with the dative is the most frequent usage.

This may be a case of new vs old usage. Most of the resources I use tend to focus on classical Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LordFinchley

A rush of exhilaration came when I instinctively new semper from the motto 'Semper Fidelis' of the USMC. They say Latin is dead? Absolutely not! Anyone else have a moment like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth305273

Lol for me it was advent from advent calendars


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sam82410

why is "pupils" not accepted in this particular exercise?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

I answered "Pupils always study the Latin language" and was marked wrong. I have reported it as "My answer should be accepted".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ciaran688228

It is equally correct to say "study latin language" in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

No. We can say "study Latin" or "study the Latin language", but not "study Latin language".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathewKeen1

Why is only the reverse of linguae latinae accepted when the former is how we were taught.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

It could be. What was the rest of your answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7ga4Ktv4

what is this sentence if you would be literal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

If you think of the verb studeo as meaning devote oneself then word for word the sentence reads "[The] pupils always to [the] Latin language devote themselves".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex117166

Why is it latinae linguae and not linguae latinae?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

It could be. What was the rest of your answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonBrenn612658

If it's the listening test you have to type it as spoken, otherwise either should be acceptable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaWeir1

pupils should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dparvaz

Does "semper" get used to mean "still" in Latin like "toujours" does in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanDigital

Why is "The students are always studying latin literature" wrong? I swear I've translated other present tense sentences as present progressive, but they were counted as correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dparvaz

Because "lingua" means "tongue/language". Your translation would fit "Discipulae semper litteras latinas student."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

can studere also mean 'to learn'? I translated it The students always learn the latin language and it was marked wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

No. "Studere" means "to dedicate oneself to/to be diligent in/to direct one's attention to". This is also why it takes the dative case.

"Discere" means "to learn" and takes the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gaufridius5

DL has given linguae latinae in previous lessons, especially all those early ones. Why does it now require latinae linguae!!! It doesnt make sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2608

What was the rest of your answer? Because it can go either way. You likely had an error that you didn't see.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/els976518

It should be linguae Latinae...not Latinae linguae!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel139854

Since when a name of a language needs an article in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucretius6

"The Latin language (genitive) students are always studying" also works

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