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  5. "Marcus iter longum ad urbem …

"Marcus iter longum ad urbem facit."

Translation:Marcus makes a long journey to the city.

September 1, 2019

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TankTopBigJeff

I don't mean to be horrible, but I cannot make out what he said.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannah483469

How do you know if ad is to or from


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dscpp

Ad always means to/towards/etc. "A/ab" is from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Niklas760215

Do you use 'a' before a consonant and 'ab' before a vowel?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlafPeters3

"Ad" is to and needs an accusativ, but as many others I hear "a" which means from and needs an ablativ. Sometimes I am very sad about the translations


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pitaahio

Why is iter not in the accusative and urbem not in the ablative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew766703

Iter is a neuter noun, so it is in the accusative case along with longum. Urbem is in the accusative because it indicates motion towards rather than a location within the city. I am not an expert though, so I may not be right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dscpp

Exactly. And urbem is accusative because it is the object of ad, which takes the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geoff251810

Only trouble is she clearly says here 'a urbem' which is nonsense in any language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobzal

Neuter nouns have the same form in the accusative and neuter. How do you tell them apart in a sentence? It usually comes down to a question of what makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

"Neuter nouns have the same form in the accusative and neuter."

Did you mean to say nominative, or vocative? Neuter is neuter. Iter belongs to the third declension. What do you need to "tell apart" in a sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicholas141873

in + abl = in or on. in + acc = into or onto. It has a different definition when it takes an accusative instead of an ablative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveSwart1

Why is it not acceptable to say 'Marcus travels a long way to the city."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dscpp

That sentence might have the same general meaning, but you're paraphrasing/rewording the Latin, not translating it literally. The Latin sentence has the words "iter" (journey) and "facit" (makes), so you would need to include those exact words ("makes a journey") in your answer if you want it to be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuuHansen

I put "Marcos do a long journey to the city" and they it's wrong. Why? Isn't "do" the same meaning that "make"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2612

In English, "do" and "make" are not synonyms. Also, it would need to be "Marcus does", not "Marcus do".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuuHansen

oh, right! I'm not a native speaker of english, so I didn't know that. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheTioPapita

Would it be the same to write longum iter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2612

The syntax is typically noun-adjective except for specifiers such as numbers or demonstratives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnarlsBarky

AU SECOURS! These "travel" exercises are killing me. Take this sentence, for example. I can't figure out how to know if Marcus is making a long journey to or from the city. Doesn't there have to be more context? Is the secret in the syntax? I don't get it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

ad (+ accusative) - to

ab/a (+ ablative) - from
A or Ab? This preposition has two forms: ab and a. Ab is used before words starting with a vowel or an H, while a is used before words starting with any other consonant.
https://www.duolingo.com/skill/la/Travels/tips-and-notes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnarlsBarky

THANKS for your much appreciated clarification!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DamianJank8

i pressed journey and it did not react XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WorldlyBecket

Pretty certain "city" is the indirect object here and should be in the dative singular "urbi" ...right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dscpp

No, it's the object of the preposition ad, which takes the accusative. You can think of replacing "to" with "towards" if that helps you differentiate between dative and a prepositional phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BedrichCiz

You have the pronouciation of "c" always wrong in this course


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2612

No. This course uses Classical pronunciation, which means is always pronounced /k/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Mediaeval (and modern) church Latin has C as CH (Pleni sunt coeli et terra gloria tua - Heaven and Earth are full of your glory) - where coeli is pronounced chaylee in English. Older Latin has C = K-sound.

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