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  5. "Ventus ad montem vehementer …

"Ventus ad montem vehementer ascendit."

Translation:The wind violently rises to the mountain.

September 1, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikezephyr

Why the -er ending in vehementer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1e7nx0WG

The adverb vehementer is derived from the third declension adjective vehemens. Third declension adjectives generally form their related adverb by adding iter to the base. In the case of adjectives such as vehemens, where the base, vehement, already ends in a t, only er is added.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hugh573703

Is my translation, "The strong wind ascends the mountain," implausible??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2607

"Vehementer" is an adverb that modifies "ascendit". It is not an adjective that modifies "ventus".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueH8

Why is “the wind violently ascends the mountain” incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

"Ventus ad montem vehementer ascendit."

It's ascending toward the mountain, not the mountain itself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueH8

Oh, I see now. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcarty123

I've literally never said this in my life. Can tornadoes climb mountains?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/h_sapiens

I see they sometimes change recordings (and hopefully, are improving). Should we try to learn to put a stress on almost each and every word of a sentence, like this male voice is doing? If Latin speakers in the Classical period normally talked like this, I'm okay with it and will try to lean it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenNicholl1

There is no difference in English between goes up, rises up and ascends

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