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  5. "Puella crustula sub stola ce…

"Puella crustula sub stola celat."

Translation:The girl is hiding cookies under her dress.

September 1, 2019

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cavdberg

"her" is extra in relation to Latin phrase, although it might be implicit. The exact wording in Latin correspond better to "The girls is hiding (or hides) cookies under THE dress"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ConanDoyle11

agreed, there is no possessive in the Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GunnarRica

hold up, like none? Possessive pronouns specifically I guess?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsp732649

agreed but it costs me an incorrect. pretium altum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertEddy

But if she eats the cookies, hiding will no longer be an option. A moment on the lips, forever on the hips.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timotheus_Sum

This means under a dress or under the dress. It doesn't say under her dress?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AjaySinha18

"...... sub stola celat". That simply translates as .....hiding cookies under (the) dress. The correct answer is - the girl is hiding cookies under "her" dress... Where is the "her" here ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tre_mojosa

How do we know crustula is plural in this context?

How do we know this is "her" dress and not "a" dress or "the" dress?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cyril300603

crustulum is singular crustula is plural irrespective of the context

How do we know this is 'her' dress and not 'a' dress or 'the' dress? : We don't know. If 'a' or 'the' is not accepted maybe you should report. Because strictly speaking it could mean any of the three, although 'her' might be implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

A morally shocking sentence :)

A few quotes on truth and ethics:

«in vino veritas». The truth is in wine (people will say anything drunk).

«veritas numquam perit». Truth never dies (Seneca).

«qui vitulum tollit, taurum subduxerit idem». He who steals an egg will steal an ox.

«animo furandi». With an intention of stealing (a legal phrase).

«dura lex, sed lex». The law is harsh, but it’s the law.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiovanniFo2

"He who takes a calf, will lead away a bull"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sisalbichon1

no word for 'her' in the sentence. the dress could be anywhere--even under the table with the other clothes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas50510

The speaker says crustulus.... But is is crustula!... I sent a notice


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MtthsLinguasDisc

Yes, he says something and it is definitely not "crustula". I am fed up with these lame pronunciations. Why can't they get non English speakers to do this job? English as a native language creates an oral handicap in most people. I have found very few exceptions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michelle994326

Now (March 27 2021), the (female) speaker clearly says "crustula".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoraplifej

It clearly sounds like he says "Crustulus" instead of "Crustula" (reported)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zU60uNOa

Is it a trap? What a so bad pronunciation for crustula!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akrchhff

There is a genitive case (e.g. eorum and eius have both been used). My problem is that I said "hides" and the system wanted "is hiding." Both are correct. This kind of thing drives me crazy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akrchhff

There is a possessive case. Stola puellae is the girl's dress for example. They have only used possessive pronouns, not nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoBezer20

Shouldn't it be "crustulam" (acusative), instead "crustula" (nominative)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Shouldn't it be "crustulam"

No.

crustulum is neuter. Its plural is crustula.

And neuter words always have the accusative look like the nominative -- in all the Indo-European languages I'm aware of, from Russian to Greek and from Sanskrit to English (where we have "he/him, she/her" but "it=it").

Thus crustula is both neuter plural nominative and neuter plural accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akrchhff

Nominative is crustulum (neuter). The accusative singular is also crustulum. The plural, nominative and accusative, is crustula. Neuter nouns are the same in the nominative and accusative. The -a plural appears in aedificia and carmina.

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