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  5. "My name is not Corinna."

"My name is not Corinna."

Translation:Nomen mihi non est Corinna.

September 1, 2019

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StarterX4

"Mihi nomen non est corinna"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/collegemom2017

I used this, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesPense1

Since Latin has no specific word order, where is the error? Can someone help me out with this? What I have written is the literal translation in order.

Nomen mihi (my name) Non est (is not) Corinna


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

What you have is fine. The course contributors need to add all of the different variations to all of the different sentences individually by hand, so there are bound to be a number of oversights. Please flag it in-lesson next time and report "My answer should be accepted." You will then need to be patient because first it takes time for them to process the changes, then it takes time for those changes to roll out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rmf3Qrpf

So, "Nomen mihi non Corinna est." would be a correct solution, too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Yes.

Although Latin is generally an SOV language, "esse" is a bit of a special case because it is a copular/stative verb and takes a subject complement, not an object. In this case, SVC is common, particularly with weak pronouns such as "is", which are more commonly used as demonstratives. So you could say "Is puer est" for "He is a boy", but it could be interpreted as "This boy is..." and therefore "Is es puer" would be more clear.

But the sentence you have is fairly clear and not easily misinterpreted, so it should be just fine. If you write that and it is rejected, please flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doglover425

Why wouldn't it be " Mihi nomen est non Corinna"? (sorry I'm new)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Because that's English syntax.

English is Subject-Verb-Object. Latin is Subject-Object-Verb. Granted, there is no object in this sentence, but they still follow the same general format. When the verb is a copula like "to be/esse", Latin can be Subject-Verb-Complement so that the subject and complement don't blend into each other. Latin syntax is somewhat flexible, but there are things it does not do. For example, the negation always comes before the verb, never after it. As a side note, "mihi" is not the genitive "my", it is the dative of possession "to me".


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niltic

Essentially your word order is fine overall, you just need to remember to put the negation "non" before your verb. "Mihi nomen non est Corinna" is fine!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicolaspiper

Why is mea not used here instead of mihi?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

It's literally "the name to me", not "my name". I don't think the genitive is used in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunarwolf3

I put "Nomen mihi est non Corinna" and still got it wrong, i don't understand why "est" couldn't go before "non".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Because the "non" must come before the "est".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Al3jandroHdz

It's also valid to say "Mihi nomen est Corinna"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesPense1

With this sentence, it is in the negative. You need the "non"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lemmus_Insanus

Would it be possible to write it as ""Nomen mihi Corinna est non"? For some reason it tempts me to put "non" at the end of the sentence like in German "Ich weiss es nicht", or indeed, the english "my name is not" rather than "my name not is".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

No, the "non" must come immediately before the verb. English and German are not Latin-based languages, so the grammar rules will be different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shaylanay

I answered it exactly this way and i got flagged wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmanuelMul3

What about... "mihi nomen est non corinna"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

No, that's English syntax. In Latin, the noun generally comes before most modifiers (and "mihi" is the dative "to me", not the genitive "my"), and the "non" comes before the verb.

"Nomen mihi Corinna non est" is the most typical way, with the subject first and the verb last.
"Nomen mihi non est Corinna" is also acceptable, since "esse" is a copular verb and "Corinna" is the subject complement and not any kind of object.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33904818?comment_id=39073192


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fovulonkiin

"Mihi nomen Corinna non est." is accepted as well, if anyone was wondering (haven't seen this word order mentioned in the comments yet).
No matter what Duolingo displays as prime example, I'll stick to the order I learned back in grammar school :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EuroBOI

It's absolutely ok to say Nomen mihi non Corinna est. Verbs should be on the end of phrase in latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Often do =/= should. Especially when there is a subject complement rather than a direct object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

As far as I remember it is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarakSaltz

Is "Corinna non nomen mihi est." valid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

I don't think so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gaufridius5

Agree that corinna non mihi nomen est should work


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nekhane

What's wrong with writing mihi nomen est non Corinna?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

That's English syntax. The negation must come before the verb, not after it: "non est", not "est non".

"Mihi nomen" is acceptable, but it's much more common to say "nomen mihi".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mareile2

Would "nomen Corinnae mihi non est" be a correct translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreiaTes1

What are the others declinations of "Nomen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoonwatchertheNW

wow i had no idea there could be comments here...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoonwatchertheNW

i wrote Non est mihi nomen corinna. isn't that an acceptable answer? i got all of the words correct :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fovulonkiin

Just like in English you have a certain syntax you can't just put words into any order in Latin, though granted it is fairly flexible.
Orders that work are:

Nomen mihi Corinna non est.
Mihi nomen Corinna non est.
Corinna nomen mihi non est.
Corinna mihi nomen non est.
Nomen mihi non est Corinna.
Mihi nomen non est Corinna.

Rae has some good replies in this comment section about the gammar, for example this one: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33904818?comment_id=39074899

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