1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Many young men live in Ameri…

"Many young men live in America."

Translation:Multi iuvenes in America habitant.

September 2, 2019

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaeLoecke

What exactly is the difference between multi and multae?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

«multi» is the masculine plural of «multus», «multae», feminine plural. Wiktionary is a good dictionary to see the declensions of words: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/multus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karolius2

I hate that i don't see tips on the mobile app but there are so many of them on the same course on the website. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SoScorpio

So is there a way to tell if a noun is gendered male or female, when it's not talking about a person?

So far I think I've only seen "multae" used to refer to cities or universities, or maybe just one of them?

Trying to follow the rules from other Latin-based languages, I would expect "urbs" to be a male noun and "universitas" to be a female noun. But I'm not at all sure on that. I'll have to pay closer attention when I see "multae".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

There are three grammatical genders in Latin: masculine, feminine, and neuter. If they're regular, you can generally tell from how they decline.

These are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cynolycus

Why does America require the word "in" instead of just using the locative form "Americae?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Only cities and a few other words take the Locative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lah.esq

Why is it "multae" iuvenes Romae habitant but "multi" iuvenes in America habitant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

It should never be "multae iuvenes" because "iuvenes" is masculine and "multae" is feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

I check the incubator to see if multae iuvenes was in there by mistake. Nope. There were, however, a lot of people suggesting it. They should now get a message explaining why it needs to be multi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardVan823385

what is the difference between habitat and habitant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

iuvenis habitat
iuvenes habitant

Pronoun Verb Suffix
I/ego -o
you/tu -s
he/is; she/ea; it/id -t
we/nos -mus
y'all/vos -tis
they/ei; they/eae -nt

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdblake93

"Multi iuvenes habitant in America." was marked as wrong. In some places one gets penalized for having the verb at the end of a sentence and in other places for NOT having the verb at the end of a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

The course is still in Beta. The course contributors need to manually enter all the different answer possibilities into the database individually for each question. There are bound to be oversights. Please flag it in-lesson and report "My answer should be accepted." That's the only way to alert them so they can fix it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxelGrove

They actually tell you within a few days if they accept your suggestions. And they are in fact VERY open to different translations!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

They actually tell you within a few days if they accept your suggestions.

That depends on how busy they are.

And they are in fact VERY open to different translations!

Of course they are. That's part of this being the Beta release.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagisterFl1

I agree. This keeps happening. And the type what you hear does it both ways as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SivaramNaiduK

when is "in" used and when is it omitted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

Only the names of cities, towns, small islands, and a very small handful of words, including "domus", "humus", and "rus" take the locative with no preposition. All other nouns need a preposition plus the ablative.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SivaramNaiduK

Thank you for providing me with a lot of information.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheeLearnsSmth

what is the difference between habitat, habitatis, and habitant


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/calixtomas

i type juvenes and was call wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanDavis33878

Iuvenes vs iuvenis?? Cant figure it out


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christine969755

I put - In America multi iuvenes habitant - it was marked as wrong. I thought the word order didn't matter rather it depended on emphasis. Why would my sentence be incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkhilSemwa1

When to use in and when not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

The locative case and lack of preposition only applies to the names of cities, towns, and small islands (as well as a small handful of common nouns such as "domus" and "rus"). "America" is not any of those, so it takes a preposition and the ablative case.

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WaltJabsco2

I was marked incorrect for "...familia mea in America habitant". Families are made up of multiple people, so I thought it would use "habitant", the plural form. Does it require "habitat" because even though a family consists of multiple people, it's only a single group of people? Does one usually use "habitat" when speaking of a single, specific group of people?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

A family is a singular unit, regardless of how many people comprise it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WaltJabsco2

I know this but... are there any other examples of a singular unit (comprised of multiple people) that would require the "habitat" usage, other than for "familia"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2607

All of them, I believe. You're talking about the unit, not its constituents.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Rae.F is correct. All singular subjects are singular and take a singular verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varkentje123

Is there no separate word for habitare in English? 'live' is also the word for vivere...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Yes, that's true, but context tells you it must be habitare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

English has the word inhabit, which of course descends directly from habitare. But it is not used informally to mean "to make one's home in" (a place).

Timor mortis conturbat me. 2020-05-14


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxelGrove

Multi iuvenes Americae habitant is not accepted - that is what happens when you introduce constructed words like "America" into latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagisterFl1

'Americae' would never work in Latin (and remember that Latin is not limited to the Latin of Cicero!) because names of countries never take the "locative" case function in Latin, and so you need to have the preposition "in." Names of cities, towns, certain islands (smallish ones, to be exact) and a few common nouns like "domus" have locative noun functions and therefore do not use prepositions, thus "Novi Eboraci" is in New York and "domi" is "at home." Hope that helps :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AxelGrove

Very helpful thank you. I had slowly started to realise it as to countries, since you don't say Italiae. Have a lingot on me. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KajaFoglio

It helps a lot. I would have taken a lot longer to wrap my head around this without you. Thank you.

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.