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"Quattuor pueri et multae puellae dormiunt."

Translation:Four boys and many girls sleep.

September 2, 2019

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mommarigo

I have a question about the pronunciation of pueri. The sound right now has a lot of emphasis on the "puu" part of the word. Is that really correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cjstephens

Sometimes you require "are sleeping" and sometimes you require "sleep". Both should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2606

The course contributors are not monitoring these fora, so you message was not received.

The course contributors need to manually add all of the different answers to each lesson's database individually. There are bound to be oversights. If "sleep" is sometimes rejected or if "are sleeping" is sometimes rejected, please flag it and report "My answer should be accepted" so that the course contributors can be alerted and add it to this lesson's database.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maxim2807

What kind of generalization - masculin or feminin - shoul we use when talking about both feminin and masculine objects? E.g. Filii et filiae mei dormiunt or Filii et filiae meae dormiunt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2606

I know the default in the Romance languages is masculine. It's not unreasonable to assume that is also the case in Latin: Filii et filiae mei dormiunt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giordano.a.b

I'm not sure about that since in Italian it would be "I miei figli e le mie figlie dormono" although we could say "i miei figli dormono" (which would be more common to say since it's faster), "figli" being masculine like "filii" but it would include both masculine and feminine genders, so my guess is "filii mei dormiunt" would include both genders, and "filii mei" would mean "my children" in general. In Spanish it would be "mis hijos duermen y mis hijas duermen", "mis" not having a gender, but it could also be "mis hijos duermen" same structure as in Italian to include both. In Portuguese it would be "meus filhos e minhas filhas dormem" or "meus filhos dormem" so structurally it wouldn't change much from Spanish. I have no clue about French though. So I think it's either "filii mei et filiae meae dormiunt" or "filii mei dormiunt".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henry803202

All of my Latin texts have said to always default to Masculine.

Latin was around before the days of "Political Correctness."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraLeitgeb

Our pronounciation back in school was very different. and I had six years of Latin. How about the others?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2606

Were you taught Classical Latin or something else? Because this course teaches Classical Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraLeitgeb

Well I don't know. But this doesn't sound very classical to me. We only used to read and translate anyway and of course there were church music and church texts. I think it was a different tradition, for singing we sometimes changed between Italian/German pronounciation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2606

Follow the link I provided.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraLeitgeb

https://youtu.be/ZG1AiZaXiDM This is how we used to pronounce. Ovid, I still know a large part of this, we had to learn the beginning by heart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waldyrious

Shouldn't "multiple girls" be a valid translation for "multae puellae"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

puer and puella were common terms for slaves in ancient Rome. To a Roman, this sentence could refer to slaves.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jon543430

Why is the the and symbol (&) accepted, sometimes, and sometimes not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2606

It might be accepted when translating into English.

It will not be accepted when translating into Latin, because that defeats the purpose of the lesson.

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