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  5. "Tu urbem condis."

"Tu urbem condis."

Translation:You build a city.

September 2, 2019

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Ab urbe condita -> "From the founding/building of the city".

Condita is a participle of the verb condo, used as a noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacBeatha

More specifically conditā is the ablative singular feminine of conditus meaning "having been built" so ab urbe conditā more literally means "from the city having been built".

Also don't get it confused with ab urbe condītā which means "from the city having been made savory"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

Also don't get it confused with ab urbe condītā which means "from the city having been made savory"

Oh, thank you for that! I've been wondering all day if a German Konditor really is a person who builds cakes. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Konditor is not related. It's from Latin "candire".

Candire, which stands for “candying of fruits”. ... Konditorei is the German word for a pâtisserie or confectionery shop.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacBeatha

You're English translation is definitely more natural, I was just trying to illustrate the Latin grammar more clearly for anyone who might be illustrated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"Found" is better than "build" here, as it's a more literal meaning. "To build" can be confused with building with a trowel, which it's not the meaning here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

Why then is the Word-box only offering the option "build" rather than "found", if it is indeed better translated as "found" here?

I find that a little confusing.


[deactivated user]

    In my opinion, "You build the city" would also be correct


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PennyPenni2

    I am feeling somewhat bemused. Did the Romans spend all their time establishing cities, visiting graves and being dutiful?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linguistkris

    You mean, quite unlike those horses spending their time eating rice I met in the other course? ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Czarbelini

    I have a question, when we add m like urbem does it mean a city or the city? And what about the regular one with s urbes?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    when we add m like urbem does it mean a city or the city?

    Either of them.

    urbem is the accusative case, but since Latin had no articles, it could be "the city" or "a city".

    And what about the regular one with s urbes?

    urbs is nominative singular (the city, a city); urbes is nominative plural or accusative plural (the cities, some cities, cities).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dakkant

    Great sentence! Don’t get translations like that in French


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McGonnagle

    Tu urbem condis
    (no macron)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanceWARIN

    As far as i know, I've never meant a person who has built a city.

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