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"Pavones pingues nobis placent."

Translation:We like the fat peacocks.

September 2, 2019

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clintack

Is there any way to tell whether we're talking about food or pets?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Pavonis caro = meat of peacock.
But "Pavo" can be an alive animal, or the meat.

I don't think a peacock is a pet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

People (with more money than sense?) have been known to keep peacocks if not precisely as "pets", then certainly as ornamental additions to the grounds of their residences! (Whether they eventually ate them is less certain, but I think probably not.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeinrichIV

Not a pet in the sense that it is caressed or allowed on ones lap, but as an ornament of the household freely exhibited in the house and the garden.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mister_Lingo

they also ate them roasted in their feathers sometime by the Middle Ages. probably started in Rome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edithloveslatin

Hahahahahahahhahaha just go with the flow


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahdaeng

...and we cannot lie You other brothers can't deny...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SwampCat1

You other fratres can't deny


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arancaytar

Pavones pingues nobis placent, et non possumus mentior.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Not rather "Non possumus mentiri" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BailBarker

Why does tgis course sometimes insist on 'like', other times 'pleases us'? If you're going to teach us both, at least accept both as an answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Just report.
Both are good translations.
One is literal, and makes us understand the construction, and the other one insist on the meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Can't "pingues" mean juicy, especially here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhinchie

Can pavo also be a turkey? Or am I just getting it confused with Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ordersponge

There is no Latin word for turkey since it's a New World animal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AleckPang

But there's a Latin word for New York...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rose528361

Are you saying there were no turkeys in Turkey


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankN.Stein

The scientific name for turkey is Meleagris, which is the closest thing to a Latin word for it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahdaeng

The Spanish called the turkey "pavo" when they encountered it in the Americas. The Mexicans, on the other hand, called them "huajalote" or "guajolote", which came from the Nahuatl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

I wrote this: "we like plump peacocks" - which was marked wrong. according to my dictionary pinguis can mean fat or plump (and more)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NattKullav1

In some languages peacock or some other small birds are slang words for human body part.
Did Latin have this kind of slang words?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyLiterator

Catullus II has a sparrow (passer) that his girlfriend loves to play with and have her lap.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathWizard7

Fat peacocks pleases us is marked wrong. (Reported)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catharine499251

But you made a mistake: it should be "Fat peacocks please us."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeinrichIV

pāvō, pāvōnis, m or pavus, pavī, m ? For pavo, pavones is the plural for nominative, accusative and vocative, while for pavus, there is no pavones in the twelve forms of the declention. How to choose?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teaselcardere

It sounds as if the female voice is saying "pavonis."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UndeadOndi

Sunt etiam bellus

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