https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet

"You all" for "you" plural

This is really a question about the English being used in the Latin course, but does "you all" (not "y'all") actually suggest a simple plural "you" to most Americans? In the Plurals skill in particular it seems to be being used a lot to force a simple plural Latin phrase.

As a native Hiberno-English speaker with English influence, "you all" only suggests "all of you", which is quite a different connotation. I suppose it's possible Latin didn't make the distinction, but it seems unlikely.

September 2, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamHunter20

I agree. "you all" = "all of you". "You all" for you plural is not standard and shouldn't be encouraged. What next? Bro?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chimpjeffry

I don't think that there's really a standard "you (plural)" construction in English. I know that there's some that say y'all and some that say youse and some who say you all. As it is, you all would make the most sense to me because it contains actual independent Standard English words, and you will probably be understood just about anywhere.

Also, if you're talking to a group of people, when would you not be talking to all of them? So, in my opinion, the fact that you all equals all of you isn't too important.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet

Think of a case where a group of people are asked to do a project together. It's quite possible that "you-plural" finished the task but that not "all of you" really pulled your weight in getting it done.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissSpells

I don't use 'you all' in my regular speech, but I actually think it was a good choice to include in the Latin course, as there is no english equivalent to a plural you. I wish French and Spanish courses would also mark when they want a plural answer. I find otherwise I tend to 'cheat' and only practice the singular forms I am more comfortable with. Or, maybe they could go with you (pl) in brackets, instead, to mark the plural, like some other language courses do.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimKillock

Latin for you all would be something like vōs omnēs I am sure.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet

Thanks!

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slogger

It's regional U.S.: southern. They might have also chosen "youse" or "y'uns," which are used in other regions. It seems to be employed in an attempt to differentiate plural and singular you. They also might have opposed the archaic "thee" and "thou" to you to the same effect.

"You all" or "y'all" is annoying, IMHO, to say the least. They would do better just to accept that "you" can be singular or plural. If they insiste on using "you all," it would be much better if it were used consistently, which it is not. Hopefully this will be ironed out before Beta test is through.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahVince916374

Ok

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yves23A

Yes, I remarked it. And I agree with you.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clintack

Yes. With a neutral intonation "you all" sounds like the plural of you to me. ("You guys" is actually what I grew up with, but "you all" seems to be more widely used.)

To suggest "all of you", it would need to be "you ALL" with extra emphasis.

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahVince916374

Ok

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nattristis

"You are" is already subject plural (acc), ye is object plural (dative)
Thou bist, beest is singular subject, thee is object.
They is subject, " 'em" is object.
I gave thee an apple, but thou hast given a pear.
"youse" is fine though. actually, it might help people if they use the more familiar pronouns.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamHunter20

"You are" is already subject plural - yes but nominative not accusative.

ye is object plural - yes but accusative - not dative.

"I gave thee an apple" - "I" is nominative, "apple" is accusative, "(to) thee" is dative.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nattristis

oh man, my bad... not used to them..
ye-you is nom, ye is acc, you is dat,
thou is nom, thee is acc dat?
looked on wiki and it said ye was the nom only, mad deja vu, like i thought of this a while ago

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamHunter20

Nominative: thou, you

Accusative: thee, ye

Dative is when you would use "to" in modern English - thee, ye

Cases are one of the fun things about Latin (as English has pretty much dropped them).

September 12, 2019
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