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  5. "Many women study in Rome."

"Many women study in Rome."

Translation:Multae feminae Romae student.

September 2, 2019

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jon543430

This sentence as well, wanted the same word, "in", in the sentence & again, on ny fourth attempt, my translation was accepted without the word "in".... ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

But, in Latin, in a named city/small island/town requires the use of the locative form of that word , without the preposition "in".

You can say, "in urbe" (prep. in + ablative case); but you must say "Romae" ( = in Rome , the so-called locative case of the noun). 1st decl. singular city names, like Roma, Troia, Capua, Aricia, etc., have a locative form that looks like the genitive singular.

(You use the preposition in + ablative for "in" a country, large island (with more than one city on it), continent, etc. Thus, in Italia, in Sicilia, in Africa.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Could we just say "Multae Romae habitant," and let the adjective ending (fem. pl) speak for itself? (and eliminate the redundant "feminae"?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

No, because "feminae" is not redundant. It tells you they are women and not girls.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/newms34

You... could, but it'd not necessarily be clear. It'd more directly be translatable as `Many (female ones) live in Rome". Latin was usually more willing to drop copula (the verb "to be") than other words, so:

  • Femina in urbe est
  • Femina in urbe

Are functionally the same sentence (the woman is in the city).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Presumably, in context, you'd know whether multae meant girls, women, adulteresses, empresses, washerwomen, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kendall480997

"Romae feminae multae student" marked as wrong. I thought word order was flexible. Is this not acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes, it's flexible; however, adjectives of quantity and size like multae (or omnēs ) tend to precede their noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kendall480997

oh I see, so my problem was with multae coming after feminae, not with having Romae in the beginning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Well, it's not "wrong" to start with Rōmae , but it does make the location emphatic: "In ROME (as opposed to other places), many women study."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgeHueb

How would you say that someone "studies Rome", rather than that they study in Rome?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Possibly you'd want to say Urbī Rōmae studet , putting the noun for "city" into the dative, as the object of studet ; and then the name of the city is in apposition to that dative urbī (not the locative, which of course it can be mistaken for).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

That would be a good way of disambiguating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timothe432885

In Roma or Romae should both be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

But Latin doesn't use "in" + ablative with the names of cities, towns, and small islands (of the size to have just one town). "Romae" is the so-called locative, and is the only correct form for the meaning "in/at Rome."

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