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"Psittacus ebrius meus non est pessimus, Marce!"

Translation:My drunk parrot is not the worst, Marcus!

September 2, 2019

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedheadedRogue

There must be drunker parrots somewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WallyWalla3

Clearly, there is a parrot drinking contest going on in ancient Rome! It would explain so many drunken parrots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacquesFre5

"in foro", every Saturday night.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WLakanumbers

in caupona psittacus est ebrius


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew668253

Bread and circuses, my man. Bread and circuses


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noemie1748

This is peak duolingo comedy


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

DL Latin has the best sense of humor in their sentences that I have come across in the few DL courses I slowly work through.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaTheLamia

This course is just full of twists and turns xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dreamloomer

Psittacus ebrius tuus peior est!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady330

Psittacus ebrius optimus est!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BasJongene

This sentence should be pronounced in a drunk way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul633408

It is important to stand up for your drunk parrots


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaTheLamia

Part of the charm of this course is returning to the sentences about the parrots xD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pootle15

Minime, Marce, psittacus tuus plurimos pontes delere vult


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adamdavisne

Ugh, Marcus pessimus est!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qkgATU6u

Obviously plenty of drunk parrots around. Regardless, someone else's flaws do not count as excuses. Marcus is not impressed and goes on to destroy the parrot with fire. But before it comes to that, the parrot beats him into submission. The plot thickens..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carissa789117

Oh, yes it is. The great fire was started by your parrot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeefTestos4

But he is one of the top contenders.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrankN.Stein

Well, there are so many drunk parrots around...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnarlsBarky

Wasn't it just a couple of sentences ago that our "Silvia" wanted to destroy drunk parrots? Now all of a sudden she's got a drunk parrot of her own and is its stout defender? Quite a turnaround, I must say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/besify

There needs to be a drinking game everytime Duolingo Latin course mentions parrots everyone drinks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tavi_s

Not a good idea - we'd all end up far drunker than even the parrots!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuki
  • 735

Why is "Marce" in this case? Apócope?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LGFreeRock0828

It's the vocative case. I think it's rarely used.

"The vocative case ... is usually the same as the nominative, as in English, and it is used when you address someone directly. The exceptions to the rule that the vocative is the same as the nominative are summarized in the phrase, Marce mi fili, which is the vocative for Marcus meus filius, and is a convenient way to remember that all 2nd declension nouns in -us, have a vocative in -e, that the vocative of meus is mi, and that all 2nd declension nouns in -ius have a vocative in -i."

https://classics.osu.edu/Undergraduate-Studies/Latin-Program/Grammar/Cases/latin-case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheMadChaotician

In most declensions, the vocative is exactly the same as the nominative. As I recall, it's only in the case of second declension singular nouns that the cases are differentiated. So, 'Psittacus ebrius meus non est pessimus, Livilla!' would be correct, or 'Psittacus ebrius meus non est pessimus, pater!', but not 'Psittacus ebrius meus non est pessimus, Marcus!'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liongepard

Vocativ, 2nd declension nouns, as in Tu mi fili, Brute! The last words of Julius Caesar to his adopted son, Brutus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

(Except Caesar didn't adopt Brutus, and he said "Even you, my son!" to him in Greek.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liongepard

Thank you, that is very likely. All educated Romans spoke Greek at the time. Similarly, until the XVth century, the royal court of England used French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Yes, I think the source is Plutarch's life of Caesar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew211782

And, I believe, German in the C19th with Queen Victoria (who, incidentally, only spoke German when young). The current incumbent and her family are all proficient in the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnliLin1

That was “and you.”, not “even you.”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Can Greek kai, like Latin et, mean "also" as well as "and" ? Hmmm....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dana843960

Yeah Marcus, I have heard some pretty sketchy stories about YOUR drunk parrot...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radikian

Psittacus ebrius meus non est pessimus, Marce! Mustela tua pessima est!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lautaro822697

What do you guys have against parrots


[deactivated user]

    yeah marcus shut up


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Insane_Reader

    Ohhh, so THAT'S what Marcus did


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0615Amorfa

    quia psittacus meus suaviter cantare potest.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kevmur

    Wait 'til you meet the stoned one...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

    I translated "non est pessimus" as "is not the worst one," and it wasn't accepted.

    But I think "pessimus" = "the worst" or "the worst one," so I would argue that it should be accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard847274

    I'm getting very tired of questions about drunk parrots. It was very slightly amusing to begin with and demonstrated an interesting usage of two words. But I believe this constant repetition means an opportunity to teach more useful phrases is being lost through programming that is either lazy or misguided.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EgoLupusSum

    You gotta fight....for your parrot's right....to paaaarrrty!!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLandingEagle

    Romove first the drunk parrot from your own eye before you criticize your neighbors Marcus!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Megan6881

    Shut up Marcus, gosh


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/patm0

    Payoff in the NY Times puzzle today(8/28/20). We finally get to use our parrot knowledge. Drinking habits not required in the solve, however.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whukriede

    Very beautiful elocution on this one! The should do more full sentence readings.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wolgadeutscher

    Ну как скажешь...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fernando644713

    A typical phrase in the ancient Roman empire hahahaha


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveSwart1

    'Drunken' should be acceptable.

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