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"Do you come from the city?"

Translation:Venitis ab urbe?

September 3, 2019

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EquiDono

Singular should be correct too and the usage of -ne is'nt wrong either here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulSUK

Yes, is 'Venitisne...' not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It is correct, as it implies a yes or no question.
If it's not accepted yet, report it with the report button, and wait.

Same thing for singular and plural you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

Does the 'ne imply yes or no equally? It feels to me that the -ne expects a yes, such as the English, "You come from the city, don't you? (Of course you come from the city. Only a rube would not come from the city.)"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hermine143919

very well, but it is a question with given words, and venisne is not one of them


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

If "Venitisne (pl.)...?" is correct, "Venisne (sing.)..." should also be correct, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CesarRioBrasil

Yes, it's correct, but it means you're talking about ''you" (plural). If you want to say ''you'' (singular), then venisne would be the correct conjugation.

You (singular) come: tu venis. You (plural) come: vos venitis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnSmith2142

Why is venitis ab urbe correct? I thought, we always need -ne in yes/no questions. Shouldn't "Venitis ab urbe" mean "You come from the city", while "Venitisne ab urbe" means "Do you come from the city"? So, I guess, it's possible to omit the -ne when you either pronounce the sentence like a question or write it with a question mark, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamWhit470186

Indeed. As in other languages a question can be indicated by tone of voice or by a question mark. It is not absolutely necessary to use "-ne".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fantomius

While I don't disagree with you, earlier in this course Duolingo gave me a question with two answers to choose from: "Velis" and "Velisne."

"Velisne" was the correct answer, making me think that leaving off "-ne" is automatically incorrect.

But apparently that's not really the case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaliforniaNorma

I agree with you in this confusion!!! Have Lingot for your efforts :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mvEng21

Venitisne wouls be correct here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Auoric

Please enlighten me, what is "venitisne"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulSUK

Adding “-ne” to the end of a verb that has been placed at the beginning of a sentence turns the sentence into a question (a valuable indicator in a language where punctuation is rare). So here it turns “You all come...” into “Do you all come...?”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Please, report it -> report button.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awelley

This question was a word picking question for me, however, it has not offered "venitisne" as a choice. Okay, by picking "venitis", I got it correct, but is it gramatically correct to use "venitis" in a Yes/No question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2617

Yes. Latin was a little flexible like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

There must be something missing here, especially after reading all the comments. Does the question mark determine whether "Venitis ab urbe" is a question or a sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamWhit470186

It is not a definite rule that a yes-no question begins with the verb, although that is usual. So far as I know it is also possible to say, "Ab urbene venitis?", which one might translate as, "Is it from the city that you come?", or, "Vosne ab urbe venitis?" (Is it you who come from the city?).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2617

Yes. The -ne clitic attaches to the focus of the question and gets pulled to the beginning of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anthony168031

"-ne" is necessary here, but there is no option with that enclitic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2617

It is not strictly necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zoroark571

I used Venitisne instead of venitis!!!! what is wrong with that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsclingman

How would someone know this to be a question if the question mark weren't there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2617

Probably tone of voice. It can also be "Venitisne ab urbe?" which makes it much clearer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jsclingman

Thanks! If I were to ask a question which wouldn't have a "yes" or "no" as an answer, would there be a way to tell it's a question just by looking at it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2617

Yes. At that point, the question word is not optional.

Ubi es? Where are you?
Quo vadis? Where are you going?
Unde venis? Where do you come from?
Quot discipulos habes? How many students do you have?
Quid est? What is it?
Quis est? Who is it?

etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qhalis

Should this be 'Vinitisne ab urbe?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2617

It can be, yes. Please read the other comments on this page.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/not_a_thing

All these questions about the necessity of the -ne suffix (or lack thereof) make me wonder about its presence in the 'Classical' period, specifically.

Is there evidence that Latin speakers/the Romans used intonation in speech to express questions when they wouldn't use the suffix? How else could they express questions (besides "question words" or interrogative pronouns and the like)?

In the case of written language, they didn't even have the modern question mark "?"...

Even the Greek question mark ; didn't appear until the 8th century (according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Question_mark#Greek_question_mark which gives Thompson, "An Introduction to Greek and Latin Palaiography" as reference)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kouichi-C-N

Why "Vos ab urbe venitis" is not accepted?

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