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  5. "Olivae pingues sunt."

"Olivae pingues sunt."

Translation:The olives are fat.

September 3, 2019

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrozenTundraFoxy

Penguins.. yes, they are fat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasClarke9

Penguini pingui sunt!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

The word lives on as «pingüe» in Spanish, «pingue» in Italian/Portuguese and «pinguid» in English! I had never heard pinguid as an adjective before, so a new word in the bag, thanks to this Latin course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

The word "pingue" in modern Portuguese meaning fat is absolutely unknown. I had to search to check the veracity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrSarr

Pingüe in Spanish means abundant or plentiful. But it is very uncommon.

You won't hear people on the street saying something like "estás muy pingüe" o "tienes una pingüe cosecha"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom873317

What about "they are fat olives"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaCasa0

that's also correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Or also "There are fat olives".

"pinguis" is not only oily, but also juicy.
The olives are oily. The olives are juicy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

Yes, I wrote the olives are "fatty" and got a wrong answer, though that is what a Roman would gather from the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

I'll get to it soon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yasmine_y

The meaning is different though. The one in the exercise could be a general statement. I would translate "They are fat olives" as "Illae (?) pingues olivae/olivae pingues sunt" in order to avoid creating too much confusion. It could be an alternative suggestion, sure, but I think it would be safer to leave it like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

That's what I'm talking about, adding alternate translations. It wont replace the current translation, it will go from only saying "The olives are fat" to also include "Some olives are fat", "There are fat olives" etc. And the Latin side will include more options too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamLarge

Is this where penguins comes from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

No, from Welsh pen "head" + gwyn "white".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carpetini

Pingüe in Spanish is something similar to "abundant"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aurelien502345

What about fatty olives?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneBcklun2

Does pinguis mean rich in fat i.e. fatty or does it mean a plump olive or person?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Its primary meaning is "plump". When describing wine, it can mean "oily".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KTo228

"The olives are plump" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2614

Did you flag it and report it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kevinfromdaycare

I thought fat in latin was obesus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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pinguis
greasy, fat, plump, fertile, thick, bold

obesus
obese, gross, fat, plump, coarse, stout


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reimersholme71

So the sentence in this exercise could mean "fat (plump, thick) olives" as well as "fatty (oily, greasy) olives"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Do you have a specific question about the lesson?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xaver582355

Pictores pingues picturas pulchras pingunt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fra877649

I studied latin for 5 years at the high school; I think anytime you pronounce "ae" its incorrect, as "ae" is a diphthong and it should be pronounced the same way you pronounce "e". So "olivae" is pronounced like "olive".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

The pronouncing it as an «e», is today typical of Italianate Latin, but was also the way it was pronounced generally in Europe during the renaissance before restored pronunciation became a hot topic (around the time of Erasmus). It’s not classical, but also has an organic charm about it, as it reflects spoken Latin (at that time, maybe starting as early as the 3rd or 4th century). It’s still the way Spoken Latin is taught in Italy, and also for singing choral works in Latin, so I think both forms should be respected/observed at all times: it’s not an error to pronounce the diphthong as an «e», nor it is Classical Latin to pronounce the diphthong as «ai» as opposed to technically correct «ae», which is ever so subtlety different.

Two modern Latin speakers should still understand each other, and neither of the two forms are either correct or incorrect in the context of just speaking it colloquially.

For now, our goal is to speak it, and write in it; a goal that this course will help us achieve regardless of which pronunciation we choose, in other words, «suum cuique».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fra877649

Thanks for giving me the chance to contextualize: actually the pronounce of Latin I referred to is the ecclesiastical one (the only one thought and learnt in Italy) ; on the other hand as I just realize, we are studying the classical or “rebuild” pronunciation here… :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

I'm sorry. But no, -ae is pronounced more like eye. Your pronunciation is modern where you'd say it all e weh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

That is the pronounciation in Souther Europe, not that of the officially adapted so-called new scientific one, the language of Cicero and the like. In Southern Europe and the Roman Catholic Church the Latin of later date is used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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This course teaches Classical Latin and the volunteer course contributors are doing their best to use Classical pronunciation.

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