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  5. "Stephanus feels well."

"Stephanus feels well."

Translation:Stephanus bene se habet.

September 3, 2019

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArsAlexander

Surely "se" is not necessary? "Stephanus himself feels well" vs "Stephanus feels well"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShanePatri14

You need to use "se" because it is necessary within the idiom, which literally translates here to "Stephanus holds himself well." You need to point out that the action is reflexive and not carried out on someone else. "Stephanus himself feels well" would be "stephanus ipse bene se habet." Ipse, which means himself in that sentence, is an intensifier.

Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicholas141873

"Habet" means hold, not feel. The literal translation would be "stephanus holds himself well". Just like in English, hold can have a physical meaning and a meantal one ("we hold these truths . . . ). Another translation into english could be "I consider myself not well". Se is in the accusative form meaning it is the object of the sentence.

I'm not an expert in latin so maybe I'm wrong about this though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nicholas141873

I consider myself well*


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EgoLupusSum

Wait....the answer I was given was "Stephanus bene agit". Not "Stephanus bene se habet" like it shows here. It's hard to grasp the lessons if inconsistent answers are given without explanation. I looked it up and figured it out, but the difference between my lesson and what it says here is confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Both are equally valid translations of the English "Stephanus feels well." They're two different ways of expressing the same idea.

"Stephanus bene agit" is literally "Stephanus does well".
"Stephanus bene se habet" is literally "Stephanus holds himself well".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EgoLupusSum

I understand that now. I just wish it would explain why in the lesson itself instead of making me interrupt it by coming here. More of a design of the program comment than anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/probir2

I agree to this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucas199862

Why not Stephane? I got the whole phrase right, but said it was wrong because of that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Stephane is the vocative. We need the nominative here.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/probir2

Why se bene for "well"? Why not just 'bene'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

It's not "se bene". It's "se habet".

Literally, the Latin says "Stephanus holds himself well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/probir2

Yes, it is clear now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArturBrzos

Again... Stephane or Stephanus. Is it realy that big deal? In previous lessons when i was writing Stephanus it was saying that I am wrong and corrected me to Stephane. Now I am writing Stephane as I was learned and it is wrong? Seriously?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

"Stephanus" is the nominative.
"Stephane" 'is the vocative.

If you have not been clicking through to the light bulb lessons before doing the quizzes, now is a good time to start. But to kick you off:

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArtemisGunhilde

Oops, sorry! Saw this just after I clicked post. It's been years since I was on this site and I either forgot or never noticed that the tips pages were there :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Stephanus bene sé habet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyBeatnik

Maybe "Stephanus is feeling well" would be a better translation? It matches the sentence structure better in the eyes of a beginner.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

"Stephanus is feeling well" is a valid translation, and if it is marked wrong you can flag it and report "My answer should have been accepted."

It has nothing to do with similar sentence structure, though, because Latin does not have the present progressive. "Stephanus bene se habet" literally means "Stephanus holds himself well." The "se" is a reflexive pronoun, not an auxiliary verb. And even if it were, then it would not be "habet" but a different form. After all, it's not "Stephanus is feels well".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/probir2

Bene sentit Stephanus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

I guess "bene sentit" means that he has good hearing, good sense of smell and good understanding :)
And do not put the subject at the end of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I guess "bene sentit" means that he has good hearing, good sense of smell and good understanding

There is no evidence to suggest that is the case.

And do not put the subject at the end of the sentence.

That is not typically preferred, but it is not flat-out wrong either. It merely shifts the emphasis.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/probir2

sentīre ( Latin) In English: to perceive, to feel, to experience Indicative present : sentio sentīs sentit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick572433

Why is "Stephanus bene habet" wrong? Is it a gramatical error? Or does it mean something else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

"Habere" literally means "to have/hold". The idiomatic usage of it requires the reflexive construction: "Stephanus bene se habet", literally "Stephanus holds himself well".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jim4u

I literally just followed the arrangement of the words in english. Does that mean that the arrangement of the words don't matter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No. Word order always matters. Latin is a different language from English. Syntax in Latin might be more flexible than it is in English, but it is a myth that "anything goes".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imma_be_a_potato

Am i the only one who is confused about the whole habito/habeo, habet, habes, etc? I wish there was a whole list about what the words mean, what person and what tense it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Everything is present tense right now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarenODono5

I would like to look at the declensions and other charts mentioned but get no response by clicking. How do I find these?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

I'm not sure why it's not working for you. The best I can do is give you the raw URLs instead of the formatted links:

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33822673?comment_id=34261475

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3: http://dcc.dickinson.edu/sites/default/files/Case_endings_5_decl_1_4.jpg
declensions 4&5: http://dcc.dickinson.edu/sites/default/files/Case_endings_5_decl_2_5.jpg

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-1st.png
2nd Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-2nd.png
3rd Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-3rd.png
3rd i-stem Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-3rd-i-stem.png
4th Conjugation: https://bencrowder.net/images/design/LatinConjugations-4th.png


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobBeckrin

Thank you, the full links work perfectly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JFB541211

Why is "Stephane bene se habet" marked as incorrect? Isn't the name Stephane the latin version of Stephanus?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

No, Stephanus is the Latin version of the name Stephanus.

Stephanus is the nominative form, which is what we need here since Stephanus is the subject of the sentence.
Stephane is the vocative form, which is only used when you're addressing him directly.

Please refer to my other comments on this page where I have a lists of links.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MerrickNor

I won with 1 life!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeniLucas

I got it wrong because i spelled the name wrong.. . Ugh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bcb1701

This should be "Stephanus feels good." This should take the adjective in English, since it is how he feels, not how he feels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2610

"Well" is an adjective in the context of health and wellness.

Merriam-Webster
Entry 5, definition 5.

Well (adjective)

a. free or recovered from infirmity or disease : HEALTHY
he's not a well man
b. completely cured or healed
the wound is nearly well

Choose the Right Synonym for well

Adjective
HEALTHY, SOUND, WHOLESOME, ROBUST, HALE, WELL mean enjoying or indicative of good health.
HEALTHY implies full strength and vigor as well as freedom from signs of disease. a healthy family
SOUND emphasizes the absence of disease, weakness, or malfunction. a sound heart
WHOLESOME implies appearance and behavior indicating soundness and balance. a face with a wholesome glow
ROBUST implies the opposite of all that is delicate or sickly. a lively, robust little boy
HALE applies particularly to robustness in old age. still hale at the age of eighty
WELL implies merely freedom from disease or illness. she has never been a well person

Good vs Well: Usage Guide

Adjective
An old notion that it is wrong to say "I feel good" in reference to health still occasionally appears in print. The origins of this notion are obscure, but they seem to combine someone's idea that good should be reserved to describe virtue and uncertainty about whether an adverb or an adjective should follow feel. Today nearly everyone agrees that both good and well can be predicate adjectives after feel. Both are used to express good health, but good may connote good spirits in addition to good health.

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