1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "The students always study th…

"The students always study the Latin language."

Translation:Discipulae semper latinae linguae student.

September 3, 2019

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonySci984512

Why not linguam latinam?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Studere" takes a dative object rather than accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo639847

that is my question too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2605

Because "studere" literally means "to dedicate oneself to" or "to be diligent in" and therefore takes the dative, not the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloBrene8

Super useful! I came with the same doubt. I'll expand on this verb's transitive and intransitive forms, should anyone else bump into this question:

From Wiktionary: -When used with a dative studere means to have a taste or inclination for a person or thing, to keep close to it. - Studere used with an accusative means to search earnestly for a thing, to desire and covet it.

Furthermore, here is a great resource for other verbs that might be transitive in English, yet take a dative in Latin: https://latinforaddicts.wordpress.com/tag/studeo/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Semper, very close from Spanish Siempre.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

If you know both Spanish and English, Latin is a breeze! I am loving it!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanamTraho

Why is the adjective before the noun...shouldn't it be linguae latinae?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I think so, because nationality adjectives come (usually) after the noun.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_grammar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

And yet, Duo marked me wrong on that. I didn't have time to report it because I was doing timed practice. But after the lesson I did the review and saw that my sentence was perfect except for reversing the order of those two words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pain1str

Either are correct, but after is more common


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cherylkuchta

I wrote "Discipulae semper lenguae latinae student," and it was marked incorrect. Generally that is the proper word order for nouns and adjectives. Any thoughts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Yes, that is why I opened this page too. It should be accepted. In your sentence you do have one other letter wrong, it's "linguae" with an i, not an e. But usually one-letter typos are accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

this was marked wrong Discipulae latinae linguae student semper. so 'semper' can not be at the end?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2605

Adverbs must always come before the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I also might be confused and think that they are Latin students studying languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2605

I don't have all the declensions memorized, so this might be a case (pun intended) of different cases having the same form, but generally the different cases have different forms and that would easily disambiguate Latin (nominative) students studying languages from students studying Latin (dative) languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catharine499251

It doesn't in the "correct" answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2605

The official promoted answer is "Discipulae semper latinae linguae student."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AugustoCar328482

Discipulae è il soggetto (anche se non si capisce che debbano essere femmine). La lingua latina il complemento oggetto e quindi va all'accusativo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Guarda quello che ha scritto Rae.F sopra: che il verbo "studere" vuol dire "dedicarsi a," e dunque regge il dativo invece dell'accusativo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuuhaku_Kaiser

''Discipulae semper student latinae linguae.'' is another correct solution too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2605

Technically, but that's not the most common arrangement. Latin was primarily a subject-object-verb language. By putting it in English syntax, you're not really learning what's being taught.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceDoesFrench

Why not linguam latinam ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2605

"Studere" takes the dative. Please read the other comments on this page for more details.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Auth_Hiril

Is it necessary to specify it's lingua latina? It does seem vaguely artificial when the "language" is specifically stated rather than implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Yes it is necessary. The "language" part is not implied by the Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henricus511823

Why not latine, if you use hispanice or anglice, you can apply the same rule for latin language as latine - by the way, latine is in the literature thebword that is often used


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Latine" means "in a Latin manner" and does not fit here. It works with a verb like "loquor" since "speaking in a Latin manner" more or less implies "speaking the Latin language." But "studying in a Latin manner" does not mean "studying the Latin language."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elisabeth910670

Why discipulae and not discipuli?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

Both are correct.

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.