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  5. "His name is Stephanus."

"His name is Stephanus."

Translation:Nomen ei est Stephanus.

September 3, 2019

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batgris

The correct is "Nomen ei Stephanus est "right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's also a good answer, and it's the most common form, with the verb at the end, but other word order aren't wrong, as least than it's "Nomen ei" or "Ei nomen", and those 2 words stay close, I think. Please, someone correct me if I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DTSFF
  • 1614

Thanks. I wondered what would be the most natural order for this question, too. I typed "Stephanus ei nomen est" and it was accepted, but I guess that with Subject-Object-Verb, yours makes more sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Creetivus

Despite the SOV order being more commonly seen, SVO is also perfectly fine, especially with the copula, "to be".

Correct me if I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeafTounge

SUBJECT- OBJECT- VERB It pertains to word order


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Acculturat

Shouldn't we be using "eius" instead of "ei"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"Ei" is the dative of "is" (he).

We already met "Mihi nomen est..." (my name is). We know that "mihi" is in dative, not nominative. Nominative for "ego" is "ego" (=I).

Ego sum = I am (nominative).
Mihi nomen = My name (dative).

It's because it means literally "To me the name is..."
And the "To me" is the dative.

http://people.hsc.edu/drjclassics/Latin/index_cards/is_ea_id.shtm
http://www.dicolatin.com/FR/LAK/0/MIHI/index.htm

So, when I say "his/her cat" I would use eius, and with nomen, it's ei?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alstrkw

The dative form is ei.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluFoot

Why would we use the dative form here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alstrkw

That's just Latin idiom, which is maybe an excuse for saying that there isn't really much of a reason. The sentence is not a predicate (which would use the genitive to say that the name is "his" like a thing that he possesses), but a personal attribution, describing Stephanus's identity.

The sentence functions more like "He is called Stephanus" or, as it became in Latin's modern descendants, "He calls himself Stephanus" (e.g. lui si chiama Stefano, il s'appelle Etienne). I wonder if it accepts "He's named Stephanus" as a translation? I would argue that this possibility is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick572433

Should "Is nomen est Staphanus." be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

I believe "is" is the nominative for "he," so no, that's not correct. I opened the SD because in English we will say "his name is," or, "her name is," using the proper possessive adjective depending on the person's gender. But in Latin it's "ei nomen est" no matter whether a feminine or masculine name follows. Is that because the possessive pronoun (ei) has to agree with the subject, nomen?

I looked "nomen" up in wiktionary and found this:

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem). Sorry, the table formatting didn't work.

Case: Singular/ Plural - -

Nominative: nōmen / nōmina

Genitive: nōminis / nōminum

Dative: nōminī/ nōminibus

Accusative: nōmen / nōmina

Ablative: nōmine / nōminibus

Vocative: nōmen / nōmina

So, in conclusion nomen can either be nominative or accusative. Accusative means it's the direct object of a transitive verb, obviously not the case here, and nominative would be just as it is in Latin's descendant language, Italian. In Italian they would say, "Il suo nome e Livia" just as they would for "Marco," because the subject of the sentence is the word "name," not the person.

I hope someone who is advanced in Latin will chime in here to confirm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christian316186

What about "Is nomen est Stephanus"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sebasteus

nomen ejus est stephanus is not good?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alstrkw

This phrasing does occur in Latin. For example, the motto on Puerto Rico's coat of arms is "ioannes est eius nomen" (it's from Luke's gospel) which gets translated as "John is his name" — the emphasis is more on the name, than on the person.

These lessons are about greetings and introducing people so it makes more sense to use the dative form, to keep the focus on the people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MFErtre

What about "Sibi nomen Stephanus est"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaumeAran

I thought exactly the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bekah4975

Why do the names change from Marcus/Marce and Stephanus/Stephane interchangeably, without warning, in a single lesson and we are just supposed to know?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaumeAran

Marcus is Nominative (functions as subjcet in a sentence) and Marce is Vocative, like if you say "Silvia, have you seen my keys?" "Silvia" is a Vocative and "you" is the subject


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RitaPastor6

why not "Nomen ei Stephauns"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jim4u

Why is ''agit'' not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1189

"Ei nomen Stephanus est" is also accepted. 24-May-2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Conor697532

-ei- means both his and her?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaff863622

Ei means his and eae means hers.. correct me if im wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BjrnIslen1

Why do you change between Stephanus and Stephan and sometimes deduct harts in spite of the fact that the answer is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whatisyour501637

Dans mon temps, en latin, le verbe était à la fin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solidus12

Nomen ei est Robert Paulson. Nomen ei est Robert Paulson. Nomen ei est Robert Paulson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b_clem17

why do we use "ei" instead of "is"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thorfinn7

Should be - Nomen Stephanus est


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vivi165915

《JUST GO WITH THE DUOLINGO APP AND WHAT IT SAYS ABOUT THAT SENTANCE》


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1189

That's just downright wrong and dangerous.

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