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  5. "Noctu prandium non coquis."

"Noctu prandium non coquis."

Translation:At night you do not cook lunch.

September 3, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdblake93

Sometimes I cook breakfast at night.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

If you want to get very early in the morning, and not being late, that's indeed a good idea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GummerKevin

Sounds like "in noctu" rather than "noctu".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloChen2

That's what it sounded like to me. So I typed that and submitted it. Then I realized, "that can't be right".

I have learned in Duolingo that if I hear something that I know is not grammatically correct, I should not type what I hear. I need to figure out what I should be hearing and type that.

"noctū" == "at night", "by night" (locative of time within which (or ablative of time within which, using an Old Latin ending for the ablative))

"in nocte" == "during the night" (found more in Late Latin than in Classical Latin)

"noctē" == "by night" (adverb)

So, from Old Latin, through Classical Latin, to Late Latin, Romans did not use *"in noctū", apparently.

OTOH, in Classical times, the Romans did use a bare "noctū", as in

"Noctū ambulābat Themistoclēs quod somnum capere nōn posset" (Themistocles used to walk about at night because [as he said] he could not sleep) [Cicero, in Tusc. 4.44]

http://dcc.dickinson.edu/grammar/latin/causal-clauses


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnBehun

I ALSO HEAR "IN NOCTU"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnLeddy1

You do not cook late breakfast at night. Pradium can mean breakfast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Breakfast was more ientaculum/jentaculum I think.

http://www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/romans/food.html

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0059:entry=jentaculum

Prandium, was "originally first meal" (prāmdeyom ), but the meaning seems to have changed to mean "lunch".

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/prandium

Note: in the root jento (ientō),
we find the roots of the Spanish "desayuno and the French jeûner/déjeuner.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mona208606

Is noctu a noun in latin?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lediknight

Hello Mona, it is a lone word ablative so technically yes it is a noun. It comes from nox Latin for night which is third declension. You would expect "nocte" to be the ablative and nocte is a synonym for noctu. Ablatives function like adverbs in English. Translated as at night or by night.

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