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  5. "Quinque verba scio."

"Quinque verba scio."

Translation:I know five words.

September 3, 2019

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Yay, I guess you and I are both beating this dude.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thenino85

What are the other two?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlbertPere258942

Psittacus ebrius sole quinque verba scit, quia psittaci ebrii bene non studet. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marcus_Arbiter

Corrections: solum - student.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abe1029

here's a lingot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antimatter162

here's another lingot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abe1029

You're hilarious


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryHrusch

Um, " I know five words" is four words not three


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaizalZahid

"Quinque verba scio"

You are learning Latin, @RoryHrusch not English

~Vir pius sacrificat~


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cameron910753

It's only three words in Latin though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JcrT247

"Loquerisne Latine?"

Ego:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I think the correct verb for knowing (something) is cognosco, cognoscere, cognovi; I think with scio, you're expecting a whole clause (indirect statement, indirect question).

See Giuseppe's comment, below: Yes, there are indeed examples of sciō controlling a fact in the accusative (or something like nihil , nothing, or omnia , everything), although I think the longest set of examples in the OLD are for the indirect statements and indirect questions introduced by the verb. So, I withdraw my objection to "quīnque verba sciō" !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Exactly. Lingot for you. I hope they'll fix it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Maximas gratias tibi!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giuseppe297424

Actually, Lewis and Short's Dictionary has variuos examples of scio + accusative:
dispensator litteras scit, is omnes linguas scit, comoediam scire ...
And it defines cognosco as to know, but in tenses derived from the perfect, while the present usually means [t]o become thoroughly acquainted with (by the senses or mentally), to learn by inquiring ....
Other verbs are used this way in Latin, such as: memini (I remember, lit: I have recalled to my memory), odi (I hate - sorry I can't find a way to translate it in English!), consuevi (I am accustomed = I have become accustomed), see Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar §205.b and §476
This way of seeing a perfect tense as the present result of an action is common to other Indoeuropean languages: cf. Sanscrit veda or Greek οἶδα: I know (because I have seen - both have the same root of Latin video, English wit, German wissen...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brilli15Bri

When I try to read Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

verbum sapientis sat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I think it's a dative: verbum sapienti sat [est] . (A word is enough for a wise (man) .)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The3rdBeast

Let me guess, 'I collect dolls and bones'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

"I want a beer, please"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neverwitch

Uncultured beast!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

They didn't accept "I know five verbs", but the sentence is ambiguous about verbs and words, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewEpp5

Since the Latin "verbum" means "word", what is the Latin word for "verb"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Verbum can mean "verb," particularly if you specify a term like nomina ("names") for nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlbertPere258942

Centum verba linguae latinae scio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamLarge

Scio verbas optimis. Ut nullus sciat verba mea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseEllisDavis

The other two words are "psittacus" and "ebrius".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoreiraCesar

Why "verba" and not "verbas"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Verba is the nominative/accusative/vocative plural of verbum (which is nominative/accusative/vocative singular) is a 2nd declension neuter noun. The as ending appears with 1st declension nouns in the accusative plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carissa789117

Clearly you don't know how to count.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBookLvr

This guy certainly isn't smart. Maybe he's in preschool?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PenguinLover1001

you're in preschool to say that he is in preschool

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