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  5. "Stercus in via sedet."

"Stercus in via sedet."

Translation:The poop sits in the street.

September 4, 2019

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zikiri

When in ancient Rome...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Or in modern San Francisco...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fekundulo

Stercus accidit!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Lol, "Shit happens."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Stercus fit! (< fio, fieri, factus sum, to happen)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I wonder what was really the real Latin expression.
I think they would understand "stercus fit" like someone is pooping (with a case mistake) or the poop makes something.
It's idiomatic in English (and it's relatively recent English).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

The English expression has nothing to do with 'pooping,' though.

It's that casual meaning of "(bad) stuff" --Bad stuff happens; deal with it; get over it; etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I know the meaning, but it's not sure there are no connections with pooping... In French, we say a "une m*rde arrive" for a bad stuff happening.

This expression could be a corruption of "It happens", but it could be also related to the stercus. It's not impossible (like in the Forrest Gump movie)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athalawulfaz

Quandocumque in India.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fekundulo

Via dolorosa est!


[deactivated user]

    Stercus nimis male olet.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

    Dung was also used in remedies for baldness in the ancient world. The 5th century African writer, Cassius Felix, provides us with a recipe for a hair generating ointment:

    «Stercus muris cum aceto tritum et illinitum capillos educit».

    [The dung of a mouse, ground and rubbed with vinegar, produces [new] hair].

    —Cassius Felix, De medicina; Ad alopiciam.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    As a Romance language person, "to sit" used for things, even if I know it's correct, is always a bit weird to my mind.

    I was convinced that "to sit" couldn't be used for things in Latin, but only for humans and animals, but the Gaffiot told me I was wrong:

    Sedere first meaning: to sit (human, animals) on a chair.
    But can mean to remain (for humans or things, used with fog in a sentence, etc...)

    But I still doubt it was used like the verb "to sit" in english, to mean: to be there, to be placed there, for things.

    In French, Sedere gave:

    Asseoir meaning to sit on a chair, (but more rarely figuratively, to establish something.)
    Seoir, (conj. il sied), meaning to be located (archaism). And also: to be suitable.
    Situer/situation, that became later situate/situation) in English, same meaning.
    And of course, un Site, from Latin Situs (location, place).

    And the adjective "Sis" (from Latin sessus "to be seat-ed"), from the verb Seoir: to be located.

    The "sis" meaning is close from the Latin meaning here, and is from the same root, it's probably a hint, but I'm still not convinced, because of lack the dictionaries examples, meaning something else than "to remain". Someone could help me?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

    I haven't checked it yet--but how about "stat" ? (It's standing there in the street?!)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tvindy
    • 1862

    Usually, it's lying on its side. Only once in my life have I ever come across a piece of poop that was standing upright in the street (on the sidewalk, actually). It was quite a sight to behold. I even took a picture of it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loose-leaf1

    I have a new favorite word...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    Now I will swear this way.

    Steerrrcuuuus !!!!

    Now, please, I want to learn "idiot", and "jerk" in Latin.
    Just to show off, and insult other people in an intelligent way.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SlavaBob

    This should be "The poop is in the street" since poop does not sit in English. If anything, it could be "The poop is laying in the street."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xburcus

    LOLing on all these comments...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kicker-o

    they are talking about my POS car


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oruga_fantasma

    Yeah... I have 'Bevis & Butthead' moment every time I type "Stercus".

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