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"Mustelae sordidae in cubiculo habitant."

Translation:The dirty weasels live in the bedroom.

September 4, 2019

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cquark

Presumably the dirty weasels need their sleep, so perhaps the angry inebriated parrots could be used to chase the dirty weasels out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jurena12

Maybe they are/were roommates. So many things make sense now...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thevladroman

This is such a beautiful phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryHrusch

First fish on the floor, now this?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Wea·sel /ˈwēzəl/

Noun 1. A small, slender, carnivorous mammal related to, but generally smaller than, the stoat.

  1. A deceitful or treacherous person. sinónimos: scoundrel, wretch, rogue

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Yes! Though I don't know if I've ever seen it used in the figurative sense in Latin ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greg335711
  1. A furry, ground-dwelling mammal commonly found in domestic sleeping chambers and frequently associated with drunken parrots.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnarlsBarky

And deceitful comrades.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Weasel is from the Mustelidae family.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmCrazyHope

Thats why they're a bit stinky even when they're clean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonnythedog

OK... was rather expecting felis or equus after 'canis'...

but then again, anticipated aquila, strix, columba, or passer before the more rara avis of 'psittacus'...

and come to that, have we actually had avis itself yet?

(but still very much enjoying the course).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CynthiaAll13

Latin has no definite article, so 'dirty weasels' should be accepted too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Please, report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JLS31290

Glad I 'tuned in' to this discussion. Made me laugh while in lockdown.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UteEff
  • 1455

That is something Draco Malfoy would say ... ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eddiedugga

Do these weasels go "pop"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gill714966

ubi mustelae purae habitant?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

Ubi habitant mustelae purae? Mustelae purae in triclinio habitant!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gill714966

Minime! Omnes mustelae in horto non domi habitare velim, cum mures et psittaci ebrii. Omnes exire velim!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gill714966

Quaeso! Lavete mustellas sordidas, cubiculum putridum est!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseEllisDavis

Drunk parrots, Dirty Weasels... there are endless possibilities


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ogden_Lars

Can I just say that this sentence rocks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SwampCat1

The drunk parrots have friends. I wonder if they live together, writing songs and poems.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel--M.

Can this also be translated as "In the bedroom, the dirty weasels live", or does the switching around of the subject and object change the declensions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

does the switching around of the subject and object change the declensions?

No. The whole point of cases is to show the noun's thematic role in the sentence, not its syntactic position.

The only reason "In the bedroom, the dirty weasels live" probably isn't accepted is because it's a weird way to say it in English. It's somewhere between poetic and archaic and no one says that in ordinary conversation these days.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel--M.

Ah, so a more common (well, in context!) sentence of "In the bedroom live dirty weasels" would still not require a change? Because the cases, and thus the word endings, determine the subject and object, not their order, which at most usually just adjusts emphasis?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

Other way around. Whether it's subject or direct object or whatever (thematic role in the sentence) determines whether it's in the nominative or accusative or whatever (case form).

Whether it's "Mustelae sordidae in cubiculo habitant" or "In cubiculo mustelae sordidae habitant", each word still serves the same function and does not change case. "Mustelae sordidae" is still the subject (the who that's doing something) and therefore in the nominative. "Cubiculo" is still the object of "in" (saying where it's happening) and therefore in the ablative.

But yes, re-arranging the phrases within a sentence (to the extent that the grammar allows) tends to put the emphasis on different aspects. Because Latin's syntax is more flexible than English's, Latin can achieve the effect simply by re-arranging the words, whereas in English we need to add extra words to keep it grammatical, but it's essentially the difference between:

  1. He sat next to her. (standard--unmarked)
  2. She was the one he sat next to. (emphasizing who)
  3. It was next to her where he sat. (emphasizing where)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel--M.

Thank you! Have a lingot :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrKuczar

This sentence is completely absurd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Are you new to Duolingo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcarty123

Oh, cubiculo is somewhat like the English word "cubicle". I just made that connection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarrenReiley

Reminds me of some former roommates. Ah, the university days!

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