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  5. "Livia furem captat."

"Livia furem captat."

Translation:Livia tries to grab the thief.

September 4, 2019

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

From the Wikipedia article ‘Four-letter word’:

a common insult used to be es vir trium litterārum, meaning ‘you are a man of three letters’. The underlying implication was that the addressed was a fūr, meaning ‘thief’, although if challenged, the speaker could always claim he simply meant vir, that is, ‘man’.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joemaza

Why is "captare" try to catch? Isn't is just "catch", "apprehend", "grab"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thenino85

That's "capere". I think they're deliberately using "captare" to instill in us that it's a false friend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tom0153

I see I am not the only one rooting for someone to finally catch a thief.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

How about "tries to catch" and "grabs at", as synonyms for the formulaic "tries to grab" ?

A month later: or "tries to grab" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rostellan

I tried 'attempts to catch' (we don't grab things too often over here) - but the owl didn't like it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

I think they notified me that "snatches at" will work now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

Bu it does not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ci4ic4
  • 2456

"livia tries to capture the thief" not accepted. grab/capture pretty much synomyms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Gegraeppian Old English and [ghreph] (Proto-Indo-European) give the word "grab" a good pedigree, with further examples in other Germanic languages along the way. Sometimes the stalwart Anglo-Saxon way is indeed what we need.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

¿‘reaches for’?

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