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  5. "I write in the book."

"I write in the book."

Translation:In libro scribo.

September 4, 2019

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrettWettlaufer

I believe "Ego in libro scribo" should also be accepted, I flagged it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Sure. But why isn't it "In librum scribo?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gfldo

Hello,

There are many ways to talk about a place in Latin. When, like in this sentence, the latin preposition "in" is used, we can use one of two cases: accusative or ablative.

We use accusative when there is movement toward someplace involved: "When Caesar arrived in Gaul..." => "Cum Caesar in GalliAM venit..." (Gallic War 6,12,1)

We use ablative when the action takes place in a place without movement involved: "There was only one legion in [...] Gaul." => "Erat in GalliA [...] legio una." (Gallic War 1,7,2)

In this exercise, there is no movement, so we use the ablative case "in libro".

Since it is a lesson about accusative, maybe it would be less confusing for the post-beta Latin course to move this type of sentences a few lessons further.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gunungFR

Amen to that. I'm still struggling with the dative here, I don't need the ablative and its movements or otherwise as well!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrMacSinusMonkey

Exactly, because we're currently within the book, right? It's a bit of a nasty place, since it's got many bookworms, but at least, it's cuddly and dim.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whukriede

I thought we were writing into the book, not while we're in it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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No, there is no motion toward. You're not 3D printing a line from the air into the book. Your hand is sitting on the page and you're moving your pen/pencil/marker around on the page.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gregor101901

For some languages it is a movement, like in German it is followed by the Accusative, or in Czech you use a moving preposition. Since no Romanic language seem to consider it a motion today, the ablative might be the most apropriate. My Latin Ego also tends to in librum, but in+Acc is usually followed by commentaries (e.g. In IV libros sententiarum, rather "about". Plus I am a barbarus germanus, my sense might be simply wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Because librum is the (singular) accusative, and here "book" is not the direct object, thus don't take an accusative.

I see a book = direct object = accusative = Video librum.

I write in a book = not a direct object = here, dative = "in libro"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CestGEMOTO

librum is direct object, the 'in' changes it to some other thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClausFenge

Actually, the case is defined by the preposition. It could be either accusative: "in librUM", indicating a movement = "into the book"; or it could be ablative, without movement: "in librO" = "in the book". Duo thinks of it as being without movement. I am not sure I agree, since something happens from the pen to the paper.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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The fact that the book is not the direct object of "scribo" but rather where the writing happens is why it's "in" plus the ablative form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderV927557

I wish they'd explain the Dative before they introduce it in exercises!

Thanks for the explanations ppl!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Velites

if it helps, the dative case takes its name from the latin cāsus datīvus (case for giving) and it's normally used when describing action that happens "to" or "for" something.

see here for more info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dative_case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrMacSinusMonkey

No, "in" comes with the accusative or the ablative, but not with the dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Every time the word order is different (if there are no word groups as "in urbe"), and every time there is a personal pronoun, they are all okay with different word order, and with or without the personal prononouns subject, and since they are all okay, and we know it, we shouldn't write here, but report with the "report" button.

All those are okay, and if there are no accepted yet, please report, and let's wait (it takes times):

Ego in libro scribo, In libro scribo, Scribo in libro, Ego scribo in libro, etc...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul392604

It would be nice if they didn't have dative in exercises before it was in the notes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

If liber is masculine -er, and is in the singular here, then how/why is it libro? How/why is it in the dative or ablative and not in the accusative, In librum scribo? (I write in book).

I'm just not getting or recognising the differences here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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It can't be in the nominative. It takes its case from the preposition "in", which here refers to a static location, so it must be ablative.

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33822673?comment_id=34261475


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

The accusative is for direct objects. That means the thing which is "verbed". The accusative case answers the question "who/what was verbed?" I'm using "verb" here as a stand-in variable for any verb. In this case, the verb is "write". If we answer the question, "what did I write," the answer is not going to be "in the book", unless "in the book" is literally the actual phrase that you physically wrote. But, of course, that's not the sentence being used in the question here. In the actual sentence here, the phrase "in the book" (in libro) answers the question, "where did I write," or, more specifically, "what did I write on?" It does not answer the question, "what did I write?" If we had a sentence like, "I wrote the answer in the book", then "the answer" might be in the accusative, because that's what we wrote. I say "might" because I don't know for sure if that's how Latin would handle it, but that's how the accusative works in a generalized sense, at least. That's the distinction that the accusative makes, and that's why we can't use the accusative here. And, so far as I understand it, Latin uses the ablative for locations that don't otherwise take the locative case, so the ablative "libro" is used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanDigital

Why is "Ego in libro scribo" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gfldo

Hello,

It is not wrong. You can report it with the "flag button" at the bottom left of your screen in order for it to be modified for the next version of the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HMROSARIES

Does the noun and the subject take on the same suffix all the time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I'm not sure what you're asking here. Latin nouns (and adjectives) come in 3 grammatical genders (masculine, feminine, and neuter) and 5 declension patterns. [1, 2, 3] [4, 5] Which case a noun is in depends on its role in the sentence. If it is the subject or the subject complement, it will be in nominative form. Here, however, it is in ablative form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomRogers14

Q. Would 'Libro scribo' mean 'I write the book'?

What would be 'I write a book?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Latin did not have any articles. "I write a book" and "I write the book" would both be "librum scribo", accusative. It's "in libro scribo", dative ablative, because it's "I write in the book".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluuDuud

How do you know when to use "in" like "in italia" or without "in" like "romae"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Only the names of cities/towns and small islands, along with a very small handful of words like "domus" and "rus" take the locative and no preposition. All other words take a preposition and the ablative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BluuDuud

so what you're saying is that most of the time it will have a preposition right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeKilling

Dative again, dont understand why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Ablative, actually. They just happen to have the same forms in this word. We're saying where something is.
http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:liber

Please refer to my reply to you in the other lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheodoreBu703144

I messed this bit up by getting the placing of the libro and scribo wrong. They should really add a typo button for those kinda mistakes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheTioPapita

What is the difference between liber and libro?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:liber


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation

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