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  5. "Patella et poculum sunt in m…

"Patella et poculum sunt in mensa."

Translation:The plate and the cup are on the table.

September 5, 2019

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thenino85

Is the pronunciation of "Patella et" correct here? It sounds like one word (possibly elision?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim410751

The male speakers in this course often sound like they were recorded with the microphones dug up at Pompeii.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mujilen

When two vowels were in contact between two words they could be pronounced in one syllable, as a diphtong; it's what is called synaeresis in phonetics.


[deactivated user]

    Hardly a good idea at the beginners level. Furthermore, this sentence has a plural verb (because of patella et poculum) which further encourages the notion that the subject includes patellae.


    [deactivated user]

      You are quite correct. It is confusing.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam704969

      The speaker REALLY swallows the T in "et", to the point that it's almost inaudible. I have trouble understanding him in general.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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      • 2604

      You'll need to flag the lesson and report a problem with the audio.


      [deactivated user]

        Oh good, I’m not the only one!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Honcongensis

        The t' is also very faint so it sounds likepatellae poculum'


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dorkami

        Your kneecap is called patella as well.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lupercus1

        Because it is a "plate."


        [deactivated user]

          I’m hearing patellae, not, apparently, patella et.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamMcG445752

          finally, something that's not on the floor!


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustinMast4

          Just wait until we learn the word for dancing, then we'll get a Beauty and the Beast style dinner AND be able to describe it in Latin!


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

          saltō, saltāre is a verb that means "to dance."


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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          • 2604

          If I'm not mistaken, it also means "to jump" and it's where "sauté" comes from.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

          Yes: saltāre is the "frequentative" form of saliō, salīre, to leap.

          The perf. pass. ptcpl. saltātus gives rise to sauté, in French, as you say.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet
          • 174

          How does one distinguish in and on other than via context?


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elaphos1

          Also, "in" with the ablative case means "in, on, at", with the accusative case, however, it means "to, into, onto, against".


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nanani6

          It should accept the answer without a second 'the'.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catharine499251

          Accepted 2020-09-13


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

          Here's a glitch: my translation (The dish and cup are on the table) wasn't accepted--is it because "the" is required (supposedly) before each noun?!

          Yikes--looks like it has to be "plate" instead of "dish"--strange.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rory_OConor

          What about: the plates and cup are on the table


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JefDeSmedt

          For me it also sounds like "patellae et poculum sunt in mensa"


          [deactivated user]

            Yes! I should have read the comments first... :(


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaKooi

            How are the two subjects two different noun cases?


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

            They aren't in different cases! They belong to two different declensions, but each one is a nominative singular form.

            Patella is a nomin. sing. of the 1st decl; poculum is a nomin. sing (NEUTER) of the 2nd decl. [Contrast, e.g., cibus: nomin. sing. MASC of the 2nd decl.]

            Hope that helps!


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

            so this is not what I hear, but could this version still be correct: patella et poculum in mensa sunt (what is said is "patella et poculum sunt in mensa") - I put the verb at the end.


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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            • 2604

            If it's a dictation exercise, then you need to type it the way it's said. Otherwise, yes. Latin is an SOV language, so the verb does generally go at the end. There's a bit more flexibility with the copula, however, since it helps to have a more explicit separation of subject and predicate.


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noiramb

            My dictionary translates patella as bowl, especially a bowl for sacrifice-purposes


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bufobufobufo34

            The et cannot be clearly heard


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarryLord1

            I find this speaker consistently difficult to understand. Even with the volume turned up to full (and I have no problem with hearing), I must sometimes listen two or three times and, even then, may not be completely sure what he's said. It's difficult to know now exactly how Latin was spoken anywhere in the ancient past (or more recent past), but I have the impression that he concentrates on vowel sounds and neglects to pronounce the consonants clearly. Is this a feature of Iberian languages? It would be interesting to know the speaker's native language.


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

            I agree, From my mother tongue's perspective (well, hearing in this case)- which is not English - in latin every word and letter is pronounced audible. On Duo they seem to 'swallow' endings at times, and pronounce some words with a modern accent (which one I don't know).


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
            Mod
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            • 2604

            Next time, flag it and report a problem with the audio.


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mister_Lingo

            It is off-putting that 'in' means both 'in' and 'on'


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarryLord1

            Not only in and on but also (with the accusative case) into and onto. But I'm sure if the ancient Romans could handle it, so can you. In any case, they're not going to change it now.

            Speakers of some other languages struggle with the opposite, which is our distinction of in, on and at, sometimes represented by a single preposition in their language.


            https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

            Does Spanish distinguish between in and on ? (I think there's just "en," but I could be wrong.)

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