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  5. "Minerva wages war."

"Minerva wages war."

Translation:Minerva bellum gerit.

September 5, 2019

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maja290403

I still don't understand the translation gero-to wage (English is not my first language)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

I suspect bellum gerere is idiomatic.

Like literally would be "to carry (on) war". Source: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/gero#Latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karasu4

Yes. Note that 'gerere' can also mean to wear, hold, or sustain.

Bellum gerere appears very frequently in literature. This is an activity the Romans enjoyed very much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Gerere means:

1- To accomplish/to execute/to carry out/to perform
2- To manage/to handle/to conduct (= as a chief)

3- To product/to give birth to.

4- To bring something somewhere, or to wear something.

  • From the meaning 2:
    The Latin Gerens means someone who manage (well) a business.
    -> Gave the french "gérant" meaning a manager. (old French forms something like gerens or gerans)

And the verb "gérer" meaning to manage, like managing a business.
Also "gestion" = management.

  • From the meaning 3: "to give birth, to produce":
    It gave "gestant" in French = pregnant (but used for an animal)

Gestation (French not Latin) = fact to be pregnant (for an animal)

-"Hold a war" is not idiomatic in English, but the literal meaning can be easily understood.

Latin expressions:

  • From the meaning 2 or 1

Bellum gero = I "conduct" the war (to wage war, idiomatically in English)/I make war

- From the meaning 4
I don't know what it gave, it is maybe somewhat linked with the pregnancy (= to wear)?

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