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  5. "Multae sorores in urbe sunt."

"Multae sorores in urbe sunt."

Translation:Many sisters are in the city.

September 5, 2019

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin-Germany

Is anybody really capable to understand the first word spoken by this speaker as "Multae"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csi

Sounded like "voltae" to my ears. Hopefully audio will improve.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alguien_MS01

At least, I am not. I heard “vulta” or “vultae” and only could write the correct sentence because of the context. That's why I reported that tha audio does not sound correct. I'd recommend you to do so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoRodri856988

I could only hear Vōtae sorōrēs in urbe sunt, "the vowed sisters are in the city." Maybe they are Vestālēs? Perhaps even Christian nuns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wormonastring

What is the difference between "multi," "multa," and "multae?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blas_de_Lezo00

multus - multa - multum is an adjective of quantity of the 1st and 2nd declention. The ending of adjectives, nouns, etc indicates the case, i.e. the function of the word in the sentence. This is the basis of the Latin grammar.

http://www.cultus.hk/Latin_vocab/adject12/multus.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Septimus734191

Would it be correct to translate this, "Many of the sisters are in the city?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelQuinter

I think that would be "Multae sororum in urbe sunt", since that's the genitive declension, "sororum" = "of the sisters", but I'm not really sure if that would be the same case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I think you make a literal translation. It's not a "of" meaning a genitive in English (a possession).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alstrkw

"Multae sororum" looks like an example of what's called the partitive genitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

That would more naturally be: "multae ex sororibus in urbe sunt".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"Many of the sisters are in the city" means that "Many among the sisters are in the city".

So, maybe "Multae inter sorores, in urbe sunt."?
(inter + acc=among)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geoff251810

You say my 'there are in the city many sisters' is wrong. Which it obviously ain't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

That phrasing sounds very odd to me; that's not how someone would say this sentence. Better is "There are many sisters in the city" or "Many sisters are in the city" or "In the city there are many sisters."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

You can report it, but don't be surprised when we miss strange or unusual wordings like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan--Niel

Many sisters in the city, is marked wrong, why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

That sentence doesn't have a verb.

"Many sisters are in the city" would be fine.

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