1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Magister litteras Latinas le…

"Magister litteras Latinas legit."

Translation:The teacher reads Latin literature.

September 6, 2019

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franci682506

Wasn't it "litteris latinis"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A_Bensonius

litteris latinis is dative, which is appropriate if the verb is studere, but legere takes the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsAnneliseJane

Thank you! I wish the different cases for these verbs were explained before the lessons started using them (unless I missed that in the "tips").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radikian

"litteras latinas" is accusative "litteris latinis" is either dative or ablative. Depending on the verb it takes either form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcdaniel16

What makes a verb need accusative or dative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2604

"Studeo, studere" really means "to dedicate oneself to [something]". Therefore it needs the dative rather than the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Timothe432885

Professor should be accepted too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

I find it distracting that the Latin language phrases carry English capitalisation. As far as I know, it should be litteras latinas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

Agreed. The capitalized words give the impression that they should be first, and that's not always the best option in Latin. Strictly speaking though, the whole thing ought to be in capital letters :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VianLKing1

Why "Teacher reads Latin Literature" is not right? why is the "the" so important?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2604

Because that's how English grammar works. Generally, singular nouns need some kind of article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyler170238

Actually, that is grammatically acceptable in English. Example: mother says to be home by 8:00. Father said not to argue. "Teacher says every time a bell rings an angel gets its wings." It's not common in English vernacular anymore but it is grammatically correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2604

That's because in those instances, you're treating the term as though it were their name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_P_Marsh

Is it my ears, or does the audio spund like there's a long I in "legit"? (Which would be wrong.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lyvras

Why is it in the accusative plural and not singular (litteram latinam)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2604

If you read the other comments on this page, you'll learn that this is because it's not the accusative at all but rather the dative. [derp...]

It's plural because "littera" is literally "letter" as in "of the alphabet". The Latin word for "literature" is literally "letters".

http://latindictionary.wikidot.com/noun:littera


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blu948123

I am confused. Is "litteras Latinas" not the accusative plural? The translation says "Latin literature" so i would expect accusative singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2604

In English, "literature" is a singular noun. In Latin, it is literally "letters", so it's plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

YOU said on the above comment that we need the accusative, not the dative. Now you say it's NOT the accusative, but the dative! Which is it?!? Also, since this course is in English, so I'm assuming taken by either native English speakers or people fairly familiar with English, why don't you have the explanations in English. I studied English all the way through the college level, and we were never taught "dative" anything. If it's an OBJECT, or the object of the preposition, can you not explain it that way? I don't even understand in the slightest what declensions are, let alone you using different words for terms we already know!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2604

My apologies. I wrote that a year ago and clearly I was confused that day. There are also comments here discussing the difference between "legere" (to read), which does take the accusative, and "studere" (to study, literally to dedicate oneself to), which takes the dative.

English does not really distinguish between the different kinds of object, but Latin does (and Spanish and Portuguese make more distinctions than English does). Learning Latin means learning declensions and declension patterns.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

What do you think of "the master"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodrigoPri152551

Difference between dative and accusative please :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2604

The accusative is the direct object of the verb.
I throw the ball. "The ball" is the direct object of the verb "throw". It receives the action of the verb.

The dative is the indirect object.
I look at the ball. "The ball" is the object of the preposition "at" (at least in English).
I give Livia the ball. "Livia" receives the direct object, so "Livia" is the indirect object.

The "da" in "dative" is the same "da" in the Spanish word "dar/to give".
Damelo! Give me that! (Or "Give that to me.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lacina16

Why not litteris latinis?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2604

Because we need the accusative, not the dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mfQu51

So Rae.F According to what you say we shall use accusative form But they accepting the dative case only Can you explain it or correct for me please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tyler170238

Professor Is an acceptable answer!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CeeCeeSong

what would "The Literature Teacher reads Latin" be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Hmmmm...perhaps magister litterarum with that genitive plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whatisyour501637

Ce serait plus facile si la traduction était en français


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2604

Ceci est le cours d'anglais vers le latin. Bien sûr, il n'utilisera aucun français.

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.