"Plurimae lectiones in libro sunt."

Translation:There are very many chapters in the book.

September 6, 2019

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daiana-1602

I am not a native English speaker but I have some problems with this structure. „There are quite a lot of“ sounds more natural to me.

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mreaderclt

Your instincts are good here, Daiana-1602. (More later.)

But first, I think the course creators use "very" here just to make it clear that there's a difference between "multus" and "plurimus."

http://www.latin-dictionary.net/search/latin/multus

http://www.latin-dictionary.net/search/latin/plurimus


Back to "very:"

My teachers taught me, a native English speaker, to avoid "very." Its use is considered weak writing. So reading "very" grates a little, anyway.

Articles offering better choices are easy to find on the Web, like this one:

https://lifehacker.com/this-infographic-lists-128-words-you-can-use-instead-of-1782748063

I don't think I'd ever say "There are very many chapters in the book." At the very least, I'd leave out the "very."

I'd be more inclined to use "There are quite a few chapters in the book."

There are lots of other choices depending on how formal or colloquial you wanted to sound. I would avoid the ones that imply there are a "countless" number of chapters, as that simply couldn't be true.

https://www.thesaurus.com/browse/very%20many

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KTea03

I am a Native speaker and it doesn't sound right to me either

September 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gladiola16683

Same for me. "Very many" was a no-no structure in my English classes. I would have never thought of it. I will learn a lot of weird English along with Latin here.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

Like I commented 3 days ago, it's peculiar yes, but not very common. The issue is that English can not always exactly represent Latin. For example, the Latin word pietas often is translated as piety, but it's more like "Manly virtue of a Roman man in the household, and with the state" but that doesn't come across succinctly. Just look at it's definition:

Plurimus -a -um The greatest number of, most numerous. (masc. pl. as sb.) most people, a very great number of people. (neut. pl. as sb.) most things, a great number of things.

And that's from Oxford, the hardest Englishing Englishmen to ever English.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

While I know it's frustrating many of you, VERY many is proper, adverbs can modify Verbs, Adjectives and Many adverbs, however, I'm slowly adding in "A great many" in as well, which sounds a little more natural.

September 9, 2019
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