"Mañana va a llover."

Translation:Tomorrow it is going to rain.

April 20, 2013

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SamiSmells

I was taught that one should use "lloverá" (form) about things you cannot decide, e.g. the weather, instead of "ir a + verb" (form) as in this sentence.

December 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/CatLordSpaceship

"tomorrow will rain" is not a correct translation? does is really have to be "tomorrow it will rain"?

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dennie54
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Not 'will rain' but 'going to rain'

May 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/cianmacbean01

i keep on writing tomorrow

March 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ronjudd
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manana va jervesh. How can that be llovar?

April 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jmullen
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If you hear a "j" sound at the beginning of a word, it's a "y" or "ll".

February 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Hilaryplace

it is the 'esh' at the end which does not sound right to me

May 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
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For what it's worth, I've heard some Mexican songs where those infinitive verb endings like -er get pronounced as -esh. Really confused me at first, especially when the same singer doesn't do it in other songs! I guess it's an accent thing

Ll as a j sound is definitely an accent. It can be pronounced like j or y or sh (and variations in between) - I don't know how consistent duo is with its accent, but it's good to be aware in case you hear it in real life

December 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
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The -esh sounds at the end of llover (and potentially all infinitive verbs and many other words) is a devoiced trilled 'r'. Since it's the end of speech, there is no use in keeping the voicing up, and since the trilled 'r' is one of those sounds that have a wide range of places where you can form it (from the back of the teeth until behind the alveolar ridge), it can sound similar to an equally wide range of sounds if it's devoiced, mostly 'th', 's', or 'sh' sounds.

May 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/WandaDancy

Talk about complete confusion. I had no clue! Jovish is what it sounds like. No explanation as to pronounciation.

November 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

Why no se here?

August 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

What would the "se" mean in this sentence?

April 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/belterglj

in english we say "it" is going to rain. so one expects a subject pronoun when translating to spanish. i think that "va" implies a subject making a pronoun unnecessary, and a reflexive pronoun would be the object anyway. is that right?

August 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
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I understand what you are getting at here, but you have confused the issue a little. You are right that se va a llover is a grammatically incorrect, but common way to say "it is going to rain", but the se isn't needed because, unlike English, the verb strongly indicates the subject.

But the problem with that question is less that the sentence has an extra pronoun, and more that irse (which is the only potential reflexive in that sentence) means "to go" in a literal "moves oneself" or "to proceed" sense (se va bien = It is going along okay). So, since there is already a specified noun, it becomes a reflexive on mañana indicating movement.

In short Mañana se va a llover. reads something close to "tomorrow is moving to rain".

December 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/RandbPetty

What is juver?

September 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Aterix

For the "Find the missing word" exercise, pretty much all of the answers would be correct, they just wouldn't make much sense.

July 12, 2017
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