"Marcus is an American young man."

Translation:Marcus est iuvenis Americanus.

September 6, 2019

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

In English, it is more common to say, "Marcus is a young American man." "Young man" doesn't have to stick together. We often refer to young people as "youth."

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batgris

Is Marcus iuvenis Americanus est wrong?

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pye20

Latin Subject-Complement clauses are nominally SVO, [ like English ].
Latin authors use Verb-Final in Subject-Complement clauses in 10% of instances.

Engish Adjective word order sequencing

GSSSACNM
G • General Opinion
S • Specific Opinion
S • Size
S • Shape
A • Age
C • Colour
N • Nationality
M • Material

Latin Word Order ALatin Word Order B • Demonstratives and Adjectives indicating Quantity and Size are nominally Attributive - Prepositive, immediately preceding the modified noun ( as in English ). • Other descriptive inherent quality Adjectives usually follow the Noun. Adjectives may get separated from the Noun, declining separately, especially in poetry.

Roman Latin word order Thoughtco

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CesarRioBrasil

Is there any specific order regarding adjectives in Latin? I'd imagine so. In English and German, the adjective comes first (ex: big house). However, in Latin-derived languages (Portuguese, Spanish, French, Italian, Romanian, Catalan etc), the noun comes before (ex: casa grande (pt) = "house big" (en). So I'm guessing there's an order to follow in Latinno matter how flexible it can be.

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

I've noticed they can be placed both before and after the described object. I can usually tell which object is being described because the declensions match. But I'm a beginner here too, there may be more complicated rules.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CesarRioBrasil

As a fellow beginner, you totally understand my doubt. Have a great day! Obrigado! ;-)

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterScham1

I find this link most useful when answering questions of Latin word order: http://rharriso.sites.truman.edu/latin-language/latin-word-order/

Common order is: noun – adjective
(except: demonstrative/adjective of quantity/size – noun)

N.B.: adjectives have “bungee cords” (endings) and can jump over other words (especially verbals) separating them from their nouns).

Some examples: Parvus puer magnum puerum pugnat. (The small boy fights the big boy). Puer stultus non docet (The stupid boy does not learn).

Adjectives are also often split by a preposition: Puer magnam ad urbem ambulat. (The boy walks toward the big city)

And always, the order can be changed to add emphasis or surprise. Rewriting the previous example: Parvus puer puerum magnum pugnat.

Here placing magnum after puerum adds a bit of suspense/surprise. If you read it in order you get something like: The small boy, a boy (oh a big one) fights. Even more emphasis could be: Parvus puer puerum pugnat magnum. That would really emphasize that the other boy is big.

September 16, 2019
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