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  5. "The bread costs ten coins."

"The bread costs ten coins."

Translation:Panis decem nummis constat.

September 6, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

«consto» traditionally demands the ablative case of the noun following it. Hence «nummis», the ablative plural of «nummus» is used here. Although when used with «quantus», the nouns that follow it can also be in the nominative plural, like in the course sentence: Quanti olivae et crustula constant? And I think «quanti» is in masculine plural here because it's ellipsing the plural of «nummus» (nummi), a masculine noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Palastram

I did wonder about what case nummis was in so thank you for pointing that out


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richlogos

You're most welcome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaiusSolitaire

Apparently because "consto" literally means "stand with". The preposition "cum" (with) takes the ablative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivar447241

panis decem constat nummis - should be correct, too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

Not sure, however, it sounds very odd to separate the adjective from the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanneMPN

Panis constat decem nummis would be correct, but it is my understanding that you would not separate the number of coins from the word coin. It could look as though you are asking about 10 breads....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkhilSemwa1

Panem vs panis Difference pls


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Landon172814

panis//bread//3rd, masc.//pan-

Panis is used here in the Nominative case -> use "panis" as shown in the Tips

Panem is in the Accusative case. Again from the Tips for Accusative case (e.g.):

(Singular) 3rd Declension//(Nom) mater//(Acc) matrem

So panis becomes panem

Helps?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanneMPN

Direct object (panem) versus subject (panis).

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