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  5. "Patronum in foro visito."

"Patronum in foro visito."

Translation:I visit the patron in the market.

September 6, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skrats

Who knew I could just find my Patronus in a market. J.K Rowling made it seem so much harder, lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewEpp5

I appreciate this one. I'm a huge fan, too. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Omega-PokePerson

Love Harry potter, LOL


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaKateTheGreat

Expecto patronum in foro.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oldestguru

Does "patronum" mean customer or business' owner? In many Romance languages "patron" means business' owner, while in English it means (buying) customer...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloChen2

I interpreted it as neither. Rome had a politico-social system of patronage. For instance, a freed slave would become the "client" of his former master, who would be his "patron".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7ga4Ktv4

i thought it meant boss, which is what i typed, but it's wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaKateTheGreat

I thought it meant protector!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

Hi, Anna Kate. The patron was a protector to his clients as far as I can make out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

I'm glad to see the point being made about the modern-day use of the word "patron". I had just been thinking that very thing, that in English "patron" means a customer but in French "le patron" is "the boss" who owns the business. Neither of course reflect the role of the "patronus" of Ancient Rome, which I've just been reading up about in Wikipedia.

"Patronum in foro visito": I wonder how common it was for a client to go to a market-place to meet his patron. From what I understand was the Roman custom, in the morning clients would as a matter of routine go to their patron's house to make their "salutation" and would be received by him in the atrium, then they would accompany him to the Forum. The bigger the entourage the greater it raised the patron's prestige. I get the impression a "patronus" probably wouldn't be very pleased with clients turning up at the last minute in the Forum! Sounds downright disrespectful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PierrePoutine

It sounds to me more like "patronAm in foro viZito".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldYTKA

Anyone please help explain "in foro"! It accepts both "in forum" and "in the market". Why that? They can't be the same, can they?

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