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"Where do you travel to?"

Translation:Quo iter facis?

September 6, 2019

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grey236

Ubi is more like a place, while quo is more of a direction to a place.

  • Ubi est? - Where are you?
  • Quo is? - Where are you going (to)?

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"you are" should be es not est, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JefDeSmedt

I guess "Quo vadis" cannot be considered correct here :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aslightrain

I think it should be. I typed "quo vadis" and hit enter before I realized that they are trying to get people to use "iter facere." When Peter asks Jesus "Quo vadis?" it absolutely can be translated as "Where are you traveling to"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathewKeen1

Ok I think I got it. You use Ubi when your asking where some1 or something is in that moment. You use Quo when asking where some1or something is going. And you use Unde when asking where some1 or something is coming from.

Correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathewKeen1

Im confused about when to use Quo vs Unde? Can someone explain the difference please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeraldSweeney

Who = whither. Unde= whence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/charly396845

Why not Quo facis iter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Quo facis iter is also correct, as changing the word order is ok. Please report if it's not accepted yet, with the report button.

I would like to know if it's possible to say "Facis iter quo?" with the interrogative words not in the first place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aadrita__

Is 'quo is' also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Not the same meaning, to go and take something in the fridge, is not a travel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lmccarty13

Would a more direct translation be: "What journey do you make?"

(the inquiry for location being implied)

And what would the expected response be? Just the location, or the expression that one is making the journey to the location? E.g. Chicago VS I am making the journey to Chicago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Would a more direct translation be: "What journey do you make?"

No. quo? means "where (to)?" and not "what?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christine969755

Could you also say Quo vadis (reminds me of a film!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmCrazyHope

Why is 'quo iter facis ad' incorrect? In going to, traveling to,& walking to, the 'to' = 'ad' in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

quo already means "where ... to".

Latin has a single word quo rather than saying ad ubi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/httpsvk.cc876521

why not: Quo iter faciunt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Faciunt has a third person plural subject (they).

Quo iter faciunt? -> 'Where do they travel to?'

You have a to use a second person ending to have the subject 'you'.

Quo iter facis? -> 'Where do you (singular) travel to?'

Quo iter facitis? -> 'Where do you (plural) travel to?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhongsiming

A more natural translation would be "where are you traveling?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Septimus734191

In English, "where" does not take the preposition "to"; it is redundant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonRusht1

It's fine to add 'to' in British English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leon_McNair

I believe it solidifies the question being made to give an appropriate response. Either, where do you travel /to/? Or, where do you travel /from/?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanneMPN

My parents would agree wholeheartedly with you. They were always admonishing us that saying "where...to" and "where...at" were redundant and poor English! It is disappointing to see how many people disliked your comment.

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