1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Patronus eorum in aedificio …

"Patronus eorum in aedificio est."

Translation:Their patron is in the building.

September 7, 2019

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eva242549

A note on the relationship of patronus and cliens in Ancient Rome would be helpful for learners new to the ancient world, as talking about one's patron is a bit unusual in modern English. IMHO Duo is a bit inconsistent; modern contexts are dragged into Latin sentences, causing Latin words to be used in non-Classical ways (e.g. universitas, familia), but then ancient concepts like paterfamilias and patronus are introduced. If I had my choice, I would go with the latter and eschew the former practice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes. You can find several explanations, from the users of this course here:
https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33828522

"Duo is a bit inconsistent; modern contexts are dragged into Latin sentences, causing Latin words to be used in non-Classical ways (e.g. universitas, familia)"

Yes, it creates confusion, and especially here with "patron", as it's a Latin word with a specific meaning, and also an English word, with another meaning.

If one only use the course, and don't read the forum, it's impossible to understand what they tried to teach us with the "patronage" thing.
A more "clever" way to introduce this concept to us, in my opinion, would have been to make sentences that explains that, for instance, "The soldier greets his patron, the Emperor". "We always pay ceremonial visit to our patrons in the morning". "The freed slave greets his patron", etc...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike474570

Would ¨The patron of theirs is in the building¨ be acceptable as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grey236

No it'd be 'of them'

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.