"Discipulus miser ad ludum it."

Translation:The unhappy student goes to school.

September 7, 2019

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duodpn1

I don't understand why "The student goes to school unhappy" is not also an acceptable translation. What would the translation of "The student goes to school unhappy" be into Latin, if it requires a different Latin sentence?

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

I'm running through, adding more translations, I'm sure I'll get to it soon.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duodpn1

Great, thanks Colin! I didn't report it because I was worried there was something wrong with "The student goes to school unhappy". Thanks for all the work you and the other mods are doing on Latin!

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoctorShoe

That would imply that "unhappy" is an adverb (and should probably be unhappily if you want to split hairs). I'm not 100% sure but I think it would be "misere" in Latin.

The difference being that one describes the noun (adjective) and the other describes the action (adverb)

September 18, 2019, 1:07 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

You bring up an excellent point, but in English, we are a bit limited on how we use our words due to the nature of the language. Latin flows much more freely. Unhappy, the student goes to school, the student goes to school unhappy, the unhappy student goes to school are all ways to say the same thing. I'll while using the adjective for of miser. Basically Latin can have mini subordinate clauses. "The student, being unhappy, goes to school." Later on you'll see adjectives in the ablative being used adverbially.

September 18, 2019, 1:40 AM
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