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"You make a journey to the city."

Translation:Iter ad urbem facis.

September 7, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/august_astrom

Could "Ad urbem iter facis." be correct as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, it is, as every other word orders are, here. Please, report it with the report button, on the exercise page.

Except: Ad urbem should be kept together, as a whole (preposition, linked to its noun).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/friskefox

What would the verb be if you were saying you plural? Would that answer be acceptable as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myrichiehaynes

how does one know this means "to the city" and not "from the city"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/friskefox

I think "ad" means "to" and "ab" means "from."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/myrichiehaynes

wow - I don't pay attention to detail apparently. But I will definitely remember these two words now. Mistakes are great teachers. Thank you, have a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thevladroman

to the city - ad urbem (ACC) from the city - ab urbe (ABL)

ad requires accusative, ab requires ablative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tristam212765

Is it urbem because its a specific city as opposed to a city?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bmhacker

Why is this flagged as incorrect: "Facis ad urbem iter", if word order is not important?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amaryllis515864

Again, ‘in urbem’ would make more sense. ‘Ad urbem’ is only correct if you won’t enter the city.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

And how do you come in a city without entering?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liang972

"In urbem" means into the city. "Ad urbem" only means to the city. I guess you can go toward the city and arrive outside the gates?

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