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  5. "Calceos novos vendere vult."

"Calceos novos vendere vult."

Translation:He wants to sell the new sandals.

September 8, 2019

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It really means "shoe", but it looks logical that "calceus" was a sandal, as it was Roman shoes.

Calceus
(Source: https://etc.usf.edu/clipart)

From "Calx" meaning the heel and, as a metonymy, the foot.

A sandal was "sandalium".

English "sandal" -> from French "sandale"-> from Latin "sandalium" -> from Ancient Greek σανδάλιον (sandálion), diminutive of σάνδαλον (sándalon, “sandal”) -> Probably from Arabic Arabic صَنْدَل‎ (ṣandal) (=meaning sandalwood, French Santal, Italian Sandalo, Latin Santalum) -> from Persian origin.

Because the sandals was originally made, not from leather, but from wood.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sandal#Etymology_2

Conclusion: I will try "sandalium" to translate "shoe" in English sentence.

That's cool they changed the word "shoe" to make it "sandal", it makes use think about what was a shoe in the ancient Rome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guntunge

From a male perspective a shoe was for me always some closed footwear. And anything with open toes a sandal. Not going into slippers, boot etc. But considering female footwear and those straps with soles they call shoes, basically everything is a shoe and only adilettes are sandals. Actually vague terms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teacon7

a) This is the only sentence in the bunch that uses the word "sandals." Everything else gave "Calceus" as "shoe." The hovertext lists both, but this one won't accept "shoes" They can use whichever they want for a primary translation, but it'd help to be consistent throughout.
b) I learned that "vult" meant "want" or "wish." Duo won't accept "wish" at present. (both reported)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sousquark

DL accepted “He wants to sell the new shoes” today (2019-09-21)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimWiest

Where did this come from? It is supposed to be part of a quiz toward the end of the "gods" section.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiyaMary2009

How come its a sandal?? I thought it was a footwear. Sandal is a type of wood, right? And how come this happen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldYTKA

So they use "calceos" for both shoes and sandals in Latin? And what else? All kinds of footwear?

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