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  5. "Tu discipulos habes."

"Tu discipulos habes."

Translation:You have students.

September 8, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dorkami

It sounds like "Tu discipulus habes"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetroniusFelis

I submitted this and it was accepted, without mention even of a typo. Is that an error?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dorkami

I think that's an error. I don't know what type of exercise you got (listening or translating) but it is either 'tu discipulos habes' or (singular) 'tu discupulum habes'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaacmolin245357

Just trying to understand; why is it "Discipulos" instead of "Discipuli"?

Is it because the verb (have) is acting on the students?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dorkami

Yes, discipulos is the object form. Discipuli is the subject form


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jasmine902590

Yes I do. They should around 100 each


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elilovesmusic

I wonder if you can type it instead of using the word bank?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wardy48

Another questionable pronunciation. In the Italian peninsula, syllables "sci" and "sce" are traditionally pronounced "shee" and "sh-EH". It's "sca", "sco" and "scu" that are pronounced "ska", "sko" and "sku". As I said in a previous thread, since we have no sure way to know what Latin really sounded like, it's the Italian pronunciations that should be followed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonGilli14

While true, we don't have tape recordings of classical Latin being spoken, and so cannot exactly know what it sounded like, we can know with reasonable confidence what classical Latin sounded like based on reconstructions from daughter languages, misspellings, contemporary pronunciation commentaries, and other sources. Those reconstructions are what you will typically find in Wiktionary entries for Latin words, often alongside an ecclesiastical pronunciation. The ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation which you describe is fine, but it's simply not what's being taught in this course, so you should not expect to find it in the course recordings.

As a side note, reconstructions of Latin are likely to be more accurate than reconstructions of just about any other language of comparable antiquity because of the relative abundance of all 3 of the sources of evidence which I mentioned above, especially the daughter languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NottinghamTram

Why does the audio sound like a van is reversing while they are recording. There is sometimes some background noise which can be off putting

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