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"Psittaci in caelum ascendunt."

Translation:The parrots rise into the sky.

September 8, 2019

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

It's consoling to know they go up to heaven after they are violently killed here at Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadAccount.

With all the stuff they've been doing, you'd have thought they would have gone to hell.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael105343

Exeunt psittaci.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

"Parrots rise in the sky" was marked incorrect and corrected to "The parrots rise into the sky".

Is in wrong here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThemistoclesL

Well, Duolingo uses 'into' to translate phrases with 'in' + accusative, like here 'in caelum'='into the sky'. In phrases with 'in' + ablative, it uses 'in'. 'In caelo' would be translated as 'in the sky'. Generally the difference is that, in+ablative means the subject goes somewhere, whereas in+accusative means that the subjects goes somewhere, and enters it. In the case of 'caelum-caelo' though, the difference is meaningless, as technically nothing can enter the sky. But the difference should be translated nevertheless...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HinjakuHinjaku

Thanks for answering. Is accusative used when motion is implied and ablative used when the object is stationary ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thevladroman

Yes, that is correct. In + Ablative = the subject IS somewhere. In + Accusative = the subject GOES/ENTERS/MOVES INSIDE somewhere/something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Considering the sky is a 3D dimension, if you rise in the sky, you rise into the sky. So, I don't think this in/into distinction make a lot of sense here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

I disagree; the into/in distinction makes a lot of difference. "The rocket exploded into the sky" paints a very different situation from "the rocket exploded in the sky". Parrots ascending into the sky start off from somewhere that is not the sky (that is at, or close to, the ground). Parrots ascending in the sky are already up there. "And on the third day he ascended into heaven", not "...he ascended in heaven".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Insane_Reader

Is drunk flying prohibited in Rome?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenBrent1

Then they fall to earth because they've had a few too many cold ones...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OzXDkf

Soon in theatres near you a new blockbuster cartoon "All parrots go to heaven".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonySci984512

In Church Latin, I have always seen the Latin word for sky written with oe, i.e. coelum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AugustoCar328482

Instead of "psittaci" I hear "tipotì". Pay attention to pronuntiation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arbuscula

Suntne illi psittaci igne deleti, qui in caelum ascendunt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lemma1789

"in caelum" - caelum is in the accusative case because we want to transmit an idea of going "into", right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arbuscula

Yes, lat. acc. expresses a direction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatheusAlv898399

An ending that befits a legend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BdS702156

They go there to party with Bacchus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldYTKA

For God's sake, are they drunk today rising into God's home?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ferret956209

Climb is also accepted for ascendunt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tal623354

So it's the end of the drunk parrots?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveSwart1

'Fly up into' should be accepted.

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