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  5. "Prima hora est."

"Prima hora est."

Translation:It is the first hour.

September 9, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philippus_Nerius

For Roman Catholics, this hour is traditionally the first hour of prayer, although it is primarily observed by those in religious life. Then comes Tertia, the third hour, Sext, the sixth, and None, the ninth. The other hours do not make use of ordinals for their names. The term "hour" itself does not signify the length of pray but just which hour of the day the liturgical prayer is said... so Prima could be any morning time depending on the local custom... noted by the regular ringing of bells!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andres.Campe

Salvete! Did Roman people measure the time of the day like this (before catholic ritual hours as Vespera liturgical hour (afternoon). Did they have the such minutes hour or what did they call Horam?

I understand they have meridian and that would be about 12 pm when the sun is at its highest point. You can determine that by looking at the shortest shadow a vertical stick casts on the floor. That's a solar clock, and when it is the middle of the day, civil at 12 o'clock, astronomically is affligit different. We still use ante meridian (AM) and post meridian (PM) to name the hours. But how did Romans do?

If Marcus wakes up before the first hour, if it a determined hour Marcus intended to wake up (or not). Or if it a standard time of the day, at least in Rome and not the rest of the Empire?

I know about Roman calendars, but know anything about daytime. If you could provide an answers or page a link I'd be very thankful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Hours were counted with sun dials, so I don't think minutes could be accurate or counted, unless you use a clepsydra, and divide the hour with it.

I don't think they did wake up at a fixed hour, more like waking up when the sun rises, like farmers, with a rooster, or awakened by the daylight.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andres.Campe

Sorry for the spelling and writing mistakes, my phones' SwiftKey dictionary has Latin, English, German and two other romance languages on at the same time (Spanish and Portuguese)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It explain the English word "noon", meaning 12 AM, I didn't understand why noon, meaning the 9th hour was 12.
It was counted in prayer time...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2606

I never thought about the origin of the word "noon".

https://www.etymonline.com/word/noon


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelFohr

I chose "It is first hour" and was marked wrong. Why is leaving out the article 'the' incorrect in this example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2606

Colloquially, "first hour" is short for "first-hour [something]" like "first-hour math class". That is not what the Latin refers to. The Latin is literal timekeeping, and the comparable English sentence requires an article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoeGladToBeHere

And he sounds like he was expecting me at the breakfast table hours ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AguacateDe1

I put "is the first hour", could someone explain me why is that wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2606

Because that is not a sentence. It's missing something. It sounds like you're about to ask a question ("Is the first hour ... ?") or you swallowed the subject (" ... is the first hour.")

The best translation of "Prima hora est" into English would be "It is the first hour." We need that "it" as a dummy subject because even though it does not refer to anything semantically, it is required grammatically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judithmack

I'm having trouble with concepts such as "before the second hour" and "after the second hour". I know people in those far-off times would have had great difficulties in being accurate about time, and additionally the time of year mattered, but is there a sense of the each hour being a moment in time? Romans seemingly did things before or after a certain hour, that is, before or after a certain point in the day (judged as best they could). The Christian prayer cycle discussed on this page had prayers that began when certain points in the day were reached.

Conversely, I think of "hours" as being a duration of time between certain points on the clock, not as the points of time themselves. It seems the Romans thought differently. Duo never has us translate "during the second hour" "during the third hour" etc. It is always "before" or "after" a certain hour.

The Ancient Roman way of thinking seems to have survived in how some modern European languages phrase questions asking the time.

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