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  5. "¿Harás comida hoy?"

"¿Harás comida hoy?"

Translation:Will you make food today?

April 20, 2013

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/delanoche

How about "will you cook today"? Was rejected...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcontex

Probably because you dropped the direct object. I guess if you leave that off you could be asking if they are cooking meth or something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uriel772534

Haras comida=made food. Cocinaras= cook


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattoleriver

Still not accepted 12/2017


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timnhendricks

I put 'Are you going to make food today?' which seems to me to be a pretty accurate American English equivalent of the answer they were looking for. Any reason it shouldn't work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acosbey

i did the same. should work, i agree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kat328570

cook without the direct object implies food. If you are cooking carrots or a meal (or meth) and want someone to know that, you would need the direct object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregHullender

I notice that our friends on the Spanish side don't seem to think there's anything wrong with the Spanish sentence.

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/2904630


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/covinm

I love that you posted that!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caithness

I make a meal, I do not make food, the farmer does that. I also think to do a meal is correct, at least better than making food.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EconomicActivist

I would avoid both "make food" (even when referring to a farmer) and "do a meal" as they both are unnatural in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcontex

I'm seeing more awkward translations in these higher levels. It's probably tough sometimes to figure out what the preferred translation should be and which ones are close enough. Sometimes I'll hear or read something in Spanish and understand it perfectly, but when I cast it into English, everything is either awkward or inadequate. BTW, it offered "cook" as the 3rd hover-over suggestion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tkdjoe

my spanish teacher, native speaker from puerto rice by the way, said that you do not "hacer comida" in spanish, you "preparar comida"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

Anyone else misread this sentence as, "¿Habrás comida hoy?"

No? Just me, then?

Okay.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

I put "Are you going to fix food today?" wouldn't take it. You can make lunch or dinner, even supper. Maybe you'd make bread. 'Better translation would be "Are you going to cook today?" I'll try it next time, but I guessing it won't take it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4evalucky

Only Americans 'fix' food! The rest of us don't think it's broken!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

ah, but you fix your hair! is your hair broken?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaMac4

Again preparar is a better verb for this, not hacer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eshewan

Isn't this sentence referring to the afternoon meal "Comida" for which the best english word I can think of would be 'lunch'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaMac4

Comida typically just means food almuerzo is lunch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fredricksonjim

In the north of spain ´comida´means ´lunch´by american standards, and almuerzo is a snack. Comida is also food but it depends on the context


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eshewan

What dialect are you speaking for? I assure you that in Mexico they refer to their dinner-sized mid-afternoon meal as "comida." I don't believe it's eaten every day. Maybe at work when they take a lunch break, it's a lighter meal like we eat in the US and then they would refer to it as "almuerzo." Can anyone shed some light on this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamaud

It accepted lunch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chaterlaine

Up until the last two or three lessons I have lost a heart every time I translated "comida" as "food" and I still do not know why. Nor do I know why it is suddenly acceptable, even desirable to say "food" all of a sudden. So I have no clue as to when I must use "meal" and when I must use "food."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rowith

Is "Are you making food today" ok?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carolalvesborges

Sincerely it's not necessary to say cook food. You can perfectly ask the question as "Will you cook today?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

I like to eat food too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikkiByer

I agree with everyone else... why say "cook food?" We don't say that, and the Spanish translation IS referring to food (they use a different verb for drugs...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaFowler0

'Do' was available as an alternative, which I used in preference to 'make'. 'Will you do food today' seemed a more natural way of asking the question but it was marked wrong :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kat328570

Duo expects us to learn less than literal Spanish sentences, but doesn't recognize English ones. In English, we would never say "Will you make food today" nor would we say, "will you cook food today". Other than the wonderfully sarcastic example of cooking meth, cooking implies food. In the US, I only hear (and say), "Will you cook today".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottBoggs3

What verb is this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraMcK10

Will you prepare "lonche" today? LOL

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