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  5. "Er geht hinaus in die Welt."

"Er geht hinaus in die Welt."

Translation:He is going out into the world.

April 20, 2013

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BettyJJ

Can someone explain to me the difference between "aus" and "hinaus"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asaf-fu

"hinaus" also explicitly says that the direction is away from the speaker.

"zum Fenster hinaus" - out the window, the speaking is inside the building.
"zum Fenster heraus" - out the window, the speaking is outside the building.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

Although 'Going out into the world' does not imply direction. When would someone use this phrase 'Going out into the world' but use the word 'heraus' instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asaf-fu

When the speaker is already "out in the world".
The "aus" part says the movement was from the inside to the outside of whatever we are talking about. ("ein" would be the other way - from outside to inside).
The "her/hin" means the direction regarding the speaker - "her" is towards the speaker while "hin" is away from the speaker.

To be more explicit:

With -aus:

"Mark geht hinaus" -> "Mark is going out thither" (archaic) -> "Mark is going out and away [away from the speaker's here]" -> Mark is going out, and away from the speaker (Mark's destination is further away from the speaker than Mark is now).
Mark geht hinaus von Berlin nach Hamburg - Mark is going out from Berlin to Hamburg (speaker is in Berlin).

"Mark geht heraus" -> "Mark is going hither" (archaic) -> "Mark is going out here [towards the speaker's here]" -> Mark is going out from his origin and his destination gets him closer to the speaker.
Mark geht heraus von Berlin nach Hamburg - Mark is going out from Berlin to Hamburg (speaker is in Hamburg).

With -ein:

"Mark geht hinein" -> "Mark is going in thither" (archaic) -> "Mark is going in and away [away from the speaker's here]" -> Mark is going into some place, and away from the speaker (Mark's destination is further away from the speaker than Mark is now).
Mark geht hinein von Berlin nach Hamburg - Mark is going from Berlin into Hamburg (speaker is in Berlin).

"Mark geht herein" -> "Mark is going hither" (archaic) -> "Mark is going in here [towards the speaker's here]" -> Mark is going out from his origin and his destination gets him closer to the speaker.
Mark geht herein von Berlin nach Hamburg - Mark is going from Berlin into Hamburg (speaker is in Hamburg).

Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbulygin

Thanks. To sum up:

  • HINaus = out THERE
  • HERaus = out HERE
  • HINein = in THERE
  • HERein = in HERE

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luzreimann

Thank you very much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rwhitlock

You gave two examples:

"Mark geht heraus von Berlin nach Hamburg - Mark is going out from Berlin to Hamburg (speaker is in Hamburg)."

and

"Mark geht herein von Berlin nach Hamburg - Mark is going from Berlin into Hamburg (speaker is in Hamburg)."

which only differ in the -aus or -ein ending, which correspond to the meanings "going OUT HERE (relative to speaker)" and "going IN HERE (relative to speaker)". How can the location of the speaker be considered both in and out at the same time? Or is there another difference between those two sentences, perhaps that the location of the speaker is considered to be different between those two sentences?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, "geht" + "her-" sounds odd to me -- it would have to be "kommt".

Because if he is going towards you, you would say that he is coming towards you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

Yes, it does. We'd say "coming out" if the implication were that he's joining us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

Bitte, sagt ihr "Er kommt hinaus in die Welt." oder "Er geht hinaus in die Welt."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wirelizard

Seems like the new word being introduced here (new to me, anyway) isn't hinaus (out) but actually the seperable hinausgehen (to go out).

DL's hints don't handle seperable verbs all that gracefully, do they?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cha5117

If this were "hinausgehen" as a verb, wouldn't the "hinaus" come at the end of the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burento

I actually would like to know if hinaus at the end is fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tehodrak

Yes it would be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/koyunlar

what is wrong with "he goes out to the world"??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

You wouldn't say it that way in English. "Go out into the world" is a fixed expression, generally used to describe leaving a relatively sheltered home/nest/monastery/etc. to live among people and engage in the activities of the world.

To me, "He goes out to the world" sounds more like making a public appearance--confronting the world, perhaps, without engaging it. First thing that comes to my mind is a public official who has just been caught doing something s/he shouldn't, then mustering his/her resolve and speechwriters and going out to make some sort of public apology.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElleLingo

"to" implies distance between the starting point and end point so your sentence would imply he was starting from the moon and going out to the world e.g. Earth. That's because this sentence is about travelling. In reality, this man is already 'in' the world, he just needs to 'get into' it.

As Soglio mentioned: if the sentence were about giving information, that would be fine because the distance is then between your mind and the receiver's mind i.e. "I'm giving this apology/information to you because..." so in that case, the information leaves the speaker's mouth and goes to the receiver's ears.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RafaRiff

Thank you very much!!!

It is a little weird for us non natives to go out into. That's how it is, and now we know a little bit more :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

If you believe your translation is right, just report it instead of posting your indignation in the discussions. Discussions are meant to ask questions and clarifying difficult grammar points. The staff does not read always read them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElleLingo

Except that they are asking for clarification about why it's wrong not saying that it should be marked correct, and that's exactly what this discussion forum is for.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Obs333

He is going out in the world.--sounds the same to me in English. I am not sure that ordinary English distinguishes between ''in'' and ''into'' as sharply as Duolingo does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/palocortado

this sounds quite awkward to me. It may be a regional difference, but I don't think this 'He is going out in the world" would be considered 'correct' in Britain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ProjectHopeless

As an American, it would strike me wrong to hear someone say "He is going out in the world", and I would personally use "He is going out into the world." Is there a Brit to clarify if these both are also correct in British English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hekeln

I'm British and I agree with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElleLingo

We do I'm afraid. Generally speaking, "in" is used to discuss location and "into" is used to discuss movement.

I'm walking in the shop (you're already inside the shop and are walking around)

I'm walking into the shop (you're not yet inside the shop, you're passing through the entrance)

"He is going out in the world" implies he is already in the world and is now having a night out (or something!) whereas the speaker is trying to say that the man is not already in the world, i.e. he has not experienced the world yet so he's going from his sheltered home into the world.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElleLingo

To add to this, colloquially, we do say "Am walkin' in' (the) shop nah" because colloquially, we will drop every single letter and word we can but in correct English, "into" is required.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsoGegenHest

Perhaps in Singlish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felipe563342

No word "the" to choose


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doublelingot

Don't work with the tiles! You don't learn a language using that tool.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulma1960

Why isnt it dative 'in DER Welt'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Please see the comment thread started by maximelon97.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vishv5

out into the world ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maximelon97

This is wrong; it should be 'in der Welt'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asaf-fu

No, it shouldn't. in is a double proposition. It uses the dative case (like you suggested) when it shows location and it uses the the accusative case to show movement.

Dative: "Ich laufe in dem Raum" - "I am walking in the room" - I am already in the room and walking inside of it.
Accusative: "Ich laufe in den Raum" - "I am walking into the room" - I was not in the room and I am now walking into the room.

And since 'he' is going into the world, this example correctly uses the accusative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibuco

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