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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarthDuo

New Blog Post! How we're improving Duolingo's course creation process

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to work at Duolingo as an intern? Or would you like to learn more about how we're improving Duolingo's course creation process? Well then check out our latest intern blog post — now live on the Making Duolingo blog. Read it here.

Written by Margarita Misirpashayeva, an intern at Duolingo this summer, this blog post explores the metrics-driven tooling used by volunteers and staff working to improve the courses we teach. We hope you enjoy this sneak-peek into how our courses are built!

September 11, 2019

316 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

track the impact on engagement with the app

And there's the problem. They are not tracking how well, how easily, or how quickly people learn a language - only their engagement. Give someone a trivial exercise (word bank, picture matching, etc) and they can engage forever. But how much have they learnt?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia177448

I think this is why the A/B test for the option to switch over to typing on the mobile versions failed. People might have been learning more, but they weren't doing more lessons... :/

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gunnar388832

I don't think it is obvious that you will learn more if you type. The great advantage with the crown system is that at lower levels you can learn about structures (such as grammatical concepts, getting a rough feeling for the word), whilst at higher level you repeat with enough detail to get things to stick. Having to learn too much at the same time might hinder rather than help.

Also, Duolingo do evaluate how well people learn, though in my experience they only use the Spanish course for that purpose :-/

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Huey616889

There is a very big difference between recall and recognition when it comes to learning. Picking words from a list is basically just recognition - speaking a language requires recall as well, and recall is far more effective in learning.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WASHEDINTHEBLOOD

huey I very well agree with that. recall is very important. I think you should do more voice questions.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FerrisJW

I agree too. That is exactly why I have been practicing writing in French the sentences I have been using in English every day . It's really helped me be able to recall words to use in variable ways that they're not used in the lessons. To be honest, I don't know how helpful it is to "There's a cow in the house" but that's a common sentence I get in the lesson right now lol. And recognition is nice but as you said, it's really not useful outside of the lessons because you don't always have a list of words to pick from...

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiraKira202

Very true, that's why I try to type most of the time. Recall is a huge part of learning a language.

September 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

All the more reason to do DL on a smartphone. You can enable an app that lets the microphone toggle between two languages or more as you dictate answers to DL. This forces you to start remembering more and more Spanish phrases. I find that the repetition is very much needed to drill the vocabulary into my mind so that correct words just come out of my mouth. I'm not that good at listening yet, however. That's why the listening exercises are so important.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

You can use a microphone on the platform version of DL: just go to settings in your profile. Have you ever tried the platform? I'm not sure about toggling between languages for the mic input. I always have a keyboard toggle handy.

September 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlKrohn1

I definitely agree. I feel my learning has increased significantly since using the target language keyboard on my smartphone. And it dramatically improves on pronunciation!

September 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Salim-10

Indeed.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

I don't think it is obvious that you will learn more if you type

Actually decades of research on learning suggests the more involvement, the more is retained. There has also been more recent work looking at effects of just eye balling or using a pointing device. It isn't good.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ontalor

I can imagine that's true, but I would guess those studies are assuming that's the only method, and students aren't digging deeper and engaging more once they're familiar, which Duo still does. It just gives an easy overview initially.

I definitely don't mind it because there are a few languages (Italian, Korean, Latin, etc.) where I would love to just go to level 1 in each tree just to get a feel for the language and an overview of what it's like but I don't want to have to memorize the vocabulary. And even then, this is an improvement over the original system where you just did 6-10 lessons in a skill and bam, you were done, with little motivation to go back and review.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

With so many children being diagnosed autistic these days, DL is an excellent venue for teaching them in a nonthreatening, beneficial way. One of the characteristics of autism is that it is very difficult for children on the bell curve of Asberger's Syndrome to learn a new language. With DL, I believe they can and, in the process, also learn to be more empathic.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelmeilevaSusi

Asperger people have difficulties learning new languages, huh? Never heard of that before. Yeah: Aspergerin oireyhtymään ei liity samalla tavoin oppimisvaikeuksia kuten autismiin. Asperger doesn't have to do with difficulties in learning the way autism does.

Anyways.. Learning new languages has always been fun to me, and I'm pretty fluent in Finnish, Swedish and English. I have also been studying German for two years in school and been practicing some Japanese and Latin on Duolingo.

And what has Asperger have to do with lack of empathy? I think it's more about difficulties noticing and understanding the feelings of others.

Sorry for ranting, but seriously.

September 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaIngels

I strongly agree with Helmeileva Susi. I have like learning languages a long time, before there was any Duolingo or other apps to use.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WASHEDINTHEBLOOD

judit you will get faster at typing the more you type. it was a joke

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

You are going to suck at any language if you only use a word bank.
It can be useful for the very beginning only.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catwantstolearn

They should have an option to disable multiple choice entirely.

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdmJota

Multiple choice is a good way to introduce new things, since there's no way for you to spontaneously know things you've never learned. But once you've successfully answered a few multiple choice questions on something, it should switch to typing to see if you've actually learned it.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

And they should have an option to disable translating into your native language because that is often far too easy.

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

@Semeltin, if you disable word banks, then multiple choice, and finally translating into your native language, what's left? What sort of tasks do you propose?

September 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giorgio182480

I wish you could disable multiple choice as of a level in a skill. Clearly, on level 1 you need multiple choice because you cannot know the words yet. But from level 2 or maybe higher up, the word bank is hindering my progress.

Rant: I started duo at a time when you would randomly either get the word bank or had to type, and I learned the words properly and quickly then. Also, for a while, I had a version where I could switch it on and off, that was great. Nowadays, my brain goes like "the word starts with ανα, so it must mean 'refer'". I have no clue how it is spelled. Sure, my engagement probably increased, because I have to repeat more often to learn anything. Basically, it now takes more time to achieve less.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gh0stwheel

While (sadly) you cannot disable multiple choice questions,
you can switch between
word-bank and active typing.
(At least on the web / desktop version)

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BookyAbroa

I tend to use the desktop version which allows you to quite quickly navigate the questions and remove the word bank.

September 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaMaquina365

Agreed

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia177448

I do think they should trust people to know for theirselves whether they want to type earlier because they feel they aren't learning enough otherwise or to stick with clicking on words because there is too much to pay attention to otherwise.

Technically, typing isn't the ideal way to learn these things, writing things by hand would be even better. But since that is a bit difficult to implement, typing is the next best method for remembering things for many people.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

The problem is some people think they are learning because they can recognize a word (from a very small pool of words).

At least they should offer several inflections of a verb or noun in the pool of words - or words that are similar. As it stands you can often guess - and feel you are "learning".

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Firetrix

The word bank is very helpful for languages like Japanese. Recognition of the character and pronunciation of the character have to come before it can be typed.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllaMcC

That makes sense. It doesn't make sense after the introduction to new material on languages that use an alphabet we're familiar with, though. However, when I tried to learn Russian, I could have used a word bank!

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biocin1

I consider the word banks to be a re-enforcing item. And a quick review and a rest from having to remember the spelling of all my new words!! I do not depend on them to teach me Spanish...they stand alone. Any student that is using word banks to LEARN will be a poor speaker indeed!!!

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanRankin1

I think we ARE learning from picking from a very small pool of words because we are actually recognizing roots of words, stems of verbs etc. But yes, once I have gone through the initial lesson once or twice with wordbanks I switch to keyboard because only by having to put in every single letter am I sure that I know the words.

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllaMcC

Exactly - if I must use the word bank, how about giving me some real choices? I'd love to see versions of soy & estar side by side in the word bank -- that would be helpful very early on.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChuckD_1

I was thinking the same thing. The correct words are way too easy to spot. Using different conjugations of the same verb would be very helpful IMO, and for me at least would help cement the verb forms in my tired brain. Many of them are not 'sticky' for me.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShakaylaBa3

i know that is right

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

The only way that I have found to get new words introduced is to use them by typing in synonyms as often as possible, as well as pushing the envelop in terms of what is an interpretation that can be accepted as an acceptable (think idiomatic) alternative.

When you do this, you start getting more vocabulary words offered in the sentences that are given to you to translate.

For example, I add the "-ísimo"suffix as often as I get the opportunity. A few days later, I start getting the alternates I suggested as new and acceptable questions and answers.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giorgio182480

The Greek course often offers two versions of a verb. Unfortunately, I'll recognise the correct ending regardless of whether I understand the word itself.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helenzie

Yes. This.

Trust people to know when they want to type / want to type more / want to type less.

This varies from user to user, and for one user, it varies from language to language and from day to day.

Being able to adjust this ourselves would be great.

At the moment, when I want to use "Tiles" more, I open the app.

If I want to type (on my phone) more, I open the chrome version on my phone. So at least there is more typing there.

But I wish it was an adjustable setting.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sea-mist

whether one is typing or writing an answer.... it's the being able to recall the answer you want which is the important thing.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet
  • 104

On the site you can choose.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fu-Gee-La

Annoyingly the audio on the site is a bit screwy on my tablet

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllaMcC

the audio is horrible on my windows 10 laptop as well. It colors words that I've not said, and as long as I say enough syllables, it thinks that's fine. So I just try to repeat every single sentence even when it's not a voice exercise - and I started a Duo group to practice for real.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

@Ella, great job! That is really important, because speaking is a skill that absolutely needs to be practiced. Muscle memory literally exists.

September 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

When I am in a hurry, I really like the word bank. In the gold levels, the opportunity to toggle back and forth between typing and the word banks also gives me a chance to introduce new Spanish vocabulary.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gwenkkelly

I started out typing everything but then came to embrace the word bank. I know I'm not memorizing most of the words when I use the word bank, but it allows me to get a feel for the new vocabulary and grammatical structures without being so stressed out that I resort to just memorizing the sentences verbatim. I start noticing patterns, like "oh, this suffix shows up a lot in adverbs" or "cool, I recognized which verb that was an irregular form of even though I'd never seen it before!" I am prepared to make more mistakes when I hit the levels where typing is required, and I feel pleased when I get those exercises right on the first try.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susu581980

I agree with you.

For me the learning process that duolingo uses, is very good. Trying to spell something that I've never seen would be miserable. I like the lower levels to get the flow of the language, to practice listening to how the words sound. It really depends on the level of involvement that the learner brings to the exercises.

The beginner very often starts using short term memory and think that they know it all. Later they get a big jolt when they discover that it is not sticking. That is why there is so much repetition to achieve level five. So it sticks.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Trying to spell something that I've never seen would be miserable.

It would be - but they do present TL to English (a few times) before asking for TL to English. :-)

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CassSwingle92

I'm so happy that this program exists. Giving kids a fun easy way to learn languages while giving teachers a way to teach them without having to do it on their own.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincentmeng

For myself, i do think that I am learning more by typing a sentence then doing the word banks.

September 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShakaylaBa3

retype that

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllaMcC

Also, the default setting for PUSHING HARD to get people to engage more & faster on the apps is simply absurd. I will be on Duo on the laptop and my phone is dinging to tell me that I've fallen out of the top ten and, gasp, may not be promoted! I honestly don't care -- my goal here it to learn to speak Spanish - well, not to pass a bunch of silly levels. I've finally figured out how to turn the thing off & just leave a reminder to use Duo daily, but man...the pushing for more XP and crowns etc is just not helpful to those who need to take time to integrate all we're trying to learn.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catwantstolearn

If you go into settings, then go onto privacy, and then disable the option to make your profile public. That'll stop those notifications, because you won't be on the leaderboards.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

Adults know enough not to salivate when a bell rings. They just ignore it.

Native English speaker here. One of the things that I've learned by doing Duo is that doing it fast and trying to make deliberate mistakes exposes me to more feedback about the correct way to speak and translate Spanish. I usually practice while I'm watching TV with my significant other. As we discuss the movie we're watching, I'm–in my opinion–suitably distracted from focusing too much on Spanish.

In my opinion, people don't actively think about their speaking as they do it because that takes too long. Everyone just opens their mouth, and the words flow out. Whatever I learn this way, I tend to retain over the long term.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sequim

I've found chasing xp to hinder learning as I wouldn't take the time to read comments or bother typing in accents, etc. So making this app more like a game is wrong!

September 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

Typing on the phones is too slow. Better to use dictation, and also, find out how to get your phone to toggle from one language to another. When I did this, I started doing more practice speaking than I had ever done in several years of studying at DL. My cognizance of Spanish increased dramatically, and I actually had a conversation in Spanish today. As David Sedaris wrote, "Me Talk Pretty One Day."

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/888eddy

But it isn't just about pace, but also about endurance. A person learning at a fast pace then quitting after a month won't learn as much as a person that learns slower but keeps going every day for a year.

I can't talk for other people, but for myself, I need it to be engaging. Otherwise, I will get fed up and quit.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claara99

Well actually you did talk about other people :-)

September 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

Agreed :)

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

If you want Duo to be engaging, try experimenting with different ways of translating a sentence from one language to another. One of the easiest ways to do this is to use singular and plural translations of "you," as well as their formal and familiar forms at every opportunity. Another way is to randomly translate a simple present tense sentence into continuous progressive tense, and vice versa.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felicity.g

Indeed. The number one demand of schools is that kids be present. Similarly, the number one need for Duo is engagement. That need is also what's behind the Duo obsession with crowns, achievements, powerups, xp, lingots etc. More on Duo & that topic here: https://theintertidal.blogspot.com/2019/04/unreality.html

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ove_sundberg

There is nothing different about Duolingo's focus on engagement than Youtube's focus on engagement, or Facebook's focus on engagement, etc. All these companies are the same. They need to show growth, and whether chasing engagement is good or bad for their users and society as a whole, they do it anyways.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Francois258134

Reminds me of the teacher training at a language school I worked at back in the days before Duolingo or even Facebook existed. The instructor asked, What's the objective of this school? I answered, There are two, viz. teaching English and making money. The trainer said it's only one of those, to which I replied, It's obviously the 1st. He corrected me and explained that the school's only objective is to make money. We, as teachers, had to make sure we did a good job in order for the school to stay in business. Now, we, as Duolingo users, have to stay enganged here to keep the website going.

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/felicity.g

They may chase engagement the same way but we don't talk about "how to make more effective video watchers" or even, with much meaning, "how to be a more effective Facebooker", but there can be, meaningfully, more and less effective language learners.  More effective probably doesn't come about though  merely by high engagement with the tool, or rather there could be probably be "even more effective language learners" by changing something fundamental in the tool, personalised language learning being only one example.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

And that's a good thing, felicity.g! I went to that website, and I just wanted to point out why that comment is a good jumping-off point for a discussion about how to become a discerning adult, and how to make good choices. Explaining just why it's better to play a game chosen not only because it's good for you but also because it makes work and learning fun–that is, to explain why that game is better than a game that doesn't prepare you for life in any way–can be a difficult thing to do.

People should never be exploited, but any game that gives a child a leg up is a good thing. After all, when you learn how to make work fun as a child, then you can put that skill into practice for the rest of your life. It's our job as parents to teach our children how to separate the wheat from the chaff.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dogomolo

@Judit294350

Have you read this blog post?

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

No. Thank you.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biocin1

Yes, why?

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ove_sundberg

Once these trees are done, we release them as A/B experiments to a portion of learners and track the impact on engagement with the app. This lets us ensure that the changes we made would actually be bEneFIciAl tO THe leArNiNG ExPeRieNcE on Duolingo.

Just go all the way and mail users free opiods after each visit. Don't worry about whether they know the material, just up the dosage the more pages they view. That would increase engagement, and therefore also be bEneFIciAl tO THe leArNiNG ExPeRieNcE.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susu581980

People learn to the degree that they wish to. Duolingo users range in age from children to seniors, each with their own goals and attention spans. Some people just want to get a golden owl as quickly as possible which they can do by doing just level one of everything. Others are doing every lesson lesson possible and digging around all over the internet to be able to understand what they are learning. Others are testing out of every level. There are others that have figured out ways to game the system to stay at the top of their leagues. There are some that spend their time judging other learning styles.

Duolingo offers an interesting platform which people are able to use in any manner they wish. I like it. (addition "and I believe it works on every level")

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanRankin1

EXCEPT I did DUolingo Italian for one year getting through just the level one tree and I went to Italy and I spoke Italian with Italians from Sicily to Milano and that was ALL DUOLINGOS FAULT!!!! So whatever metrics they are using or selling, YOU CAN LEARN LANGUAGES ON THIS PLATFORM!!! And that's why I am here!

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/susu581980

I agree with you. It is a great platform or I would have left long ago. They are working hard to make it better all the time.

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ove_sundberg

Good for you. How many minutes per day did you spend studying on Duolingo?

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vincent740819

Apparently, they haven't learnED enough.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

"learnt" is standard UK/NZ/AUS English for past tense of the verb "to learn". "learned" is an adjective with the stress on the last syllable.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magali__

thank you !

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LordEragon05

Hey DouDarth. I love your Profile Picture.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarthDuo

Is yours retro Duo dressed like Obi-Wan?!?!?!?!?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LordEragon05

yes it is DouDarth. I Photoshoped it my self in Google Paint. I found the picture. And it was the best one for an obiwan.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarthDuo

Most impressive

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peZ5YY

haha funny LOL

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanlySim

quite

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frickin_anime

some crap is about to go down

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonikaEggers

I think "I photoshopped it myself in Google Paint." is my new favorite sentence xD .

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norma212801

Kind of like Xeroxing something on an HP copier?

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VoodooSaints

or using Velcro, Kleenex, or a bandaid from some other brand?

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jabbathehut07

altering a drawing is just something you can do, while photo shop is a program I believe. Or, you can snip a pic, and then add to it, and that would be photo shopping. you are changing the photo by adding to it. I think that LordEragon is right in this context saying the definition. he didn't not say a part in the definition just to ''encompass his own meaning'' he said what was there. Instead of arguing with some one who knows what he is talking about, why don't you look up the definition yourself, smarty? or, maybe you already have. In that case, you should know that he is right, shouldn't you?

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jack30981

Looks like a fight's gonna break out

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristinWT

Photoshop can be a verb like Kleenex has become a generic noun. Or vaseline means grease or Bandaid means plastic swath to cover a boo boo. Or Q-Tips. It is flattering to have your brand BE the thing, unless ur from the Marketing Dept.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LordEragon05

Thank you very much.

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinationVoid

Search your feelings, DarthDuo. You will know it to be true.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MetiusWolfborn

yours is pretty cool as well :D

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Thanks for sharing, DarthDuo and Mararita! I have a question, what does it mean, "to quit a skill?" Because finishing a lesson isn't quitting the skill. And if you quit a skill you cannot continue in the course. So does this indicate the point in which some users quit the course? I suppose your metrics cannot tell you if the user has intentions of returning or not. For example, I haven't worked on many of my languages for a long time, but I will be coming back to most of them.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sphinx1824

I think it means how many users quit out of any of the lessons in that skill mid-lesson. They might track this simply by the number of people who stop mid-lesson ever, or the number of people who stop mid-lesson and go back to a different skill.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

This is what happened to me in Arabic: I moved on through the course at crown level 1, as I usually do, and reached a skill in which I made many mistakes, was not able to recognize enough words... so I quit mid-lesson and went back to older skills, leveling up and practicing in order to consolidate the knowledge I have acquired so far.

This point of "quitting mid-lesson" seems to be the one that Duo is tracking. I think this is a very good idea because for me, this is really a point of crisis.

If Duolingo finds that many users quit at a particular point, they could figure out how to make learning around this point easier.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

Yes, I strongly agree (if too many abandon at a particular juncture there is something amiss). I did similarly in one (lower-level section!) of the Spanish course recently - ie same feelings as you at that point : so I went back to earlier bits I knew well to re-motivate me and have continued since then to consolidate at the lower level!!

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiHacienda

I have only been doing Duo since the beginning of July 2019 and there have been times where I would become frustrated at a certain subject lesson and want to quit. But, I tell myself, you felt that way before 5 subjects ago and overcame the problems and will do so again. So, I keep on trucking. I use several sources to try to understand what I am learning. I don't ever expect 100% or even 90% proficiency (I'll take 80% at this point); but, as long as folks have a good general idea what I am trying to say, I'll take that. I've only learned 466 words so far but I go back to the prior subjects and re-take the lessons over and over again AFTER I've learned a new subject because if I don't, I'm sure I will forget prior words and rules. Only thing I don't like is the backwards, as an example, a dress of red. We don't write or speak that way in the U.S. It sounds like Yoda talking - LOL! I shall keep on trucking!

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norma212801

We also don't say things like "the house of my grandmother" but in Spanish it is "la casa de mi abuela." You will get used to el vestido rojo! (And they probably think that we are the backwards ones since there are more languages in which the adjective follows the noun than the way we speak English...unless you're Shakespeare!) Wait until you get to the difference between "un hombre grande" and "un gran hombre." SO many subtle differences that make me despair of ever reaching true fluency...

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

MiHacienda, you're doing great! It surprises me that you say you've only learned 466 words and you're already at level 21. I bet you're rock-solid. Keep up the good work. And btw, what you're doing all by yourself is called spaced repetition, a sure-fire way to get all that knowledge in your long-term memory.

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

All native Spanish speakers speak with idiomatic language conventions that are unique to said language, as do ALL other languages of the world.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

"Quitting a skill" IS NOT "quitting so that you cannot continue the course." When I quit a skill, I get a little reminder that I will lose credit for the work I did because I stopped half-way through the exercise. Some people have this option, and some people do not have it. I suspect that the people who do have this option are the same people who have been with DL for many years, as I have.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShellMarg

Do proposed changes require the review of educators or can they be driven by statistics alone?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lightning_11

???

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mustabshera

I don't understand why y'all are downvoting Lightning_11's reply. He/She probably doesn't understand English all that well.

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

It's a waste of other people's time when a person adds useless comments. That why people like me downvote him. I upvoted you, though.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew972936

Another useless comment!

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanRankin1

OH THANK YOU Margarita! I just read about your blog and it is excellent. THANK YOU! Merci beaucoup, Grazie mille, Gracias, Viele Danke and Koszonom!

One thing I am sure you controlled for, but not wanting to assume::::: OFTEN I quit a lesson because I am doing it while waiting for an appointment and other times the connection fails.... It is not ALWAYS because it is just too hard....

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gh0stwheel

Well, I'm not Margarita, but I think I can explain why it still works:

Duolingo courses have many active learners.
So, the randomly quit lessons are just that,
a Random group that cancels out.
(When the number of users is high enough)

On the other hand, when a specific lesson has been quit by a statistically large enough number of learners, it becomes apparent.

This is a well known phenomena in Statistics, Physics and several other fields, that cancels out in to the background noise as long as you take a large enough sample group.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

Thank you for that very clear explanation (& necessary postscript for those of us that are not so statistically astute!!) (0h & have a lingot ;)

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

I really like the idea of giving someone a lingot for good explanations and questions and bad ones. I do it myself. Usually, I don't mention it because I've gotten tired of reading forums with hundreds of posts, some of which are redundant/irrelevant/time-wasting. (Take your pick.) Your post was so well put, however, that I inserted my occasion plea that others only post as necessary.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

It is not ALWAYS because it is just too hard....

But sometimes the lessons need to be hard. You don't learn much doing easy stuff you can already do. It is being pushed into the "hard" experiences that actually teach you stuff.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sphinx1824

I think the point is probably to avoid making the lessons frustrating. Something can be difficult without being frustrating. If most users avoid quitting mid-lesson because they won't gain XP or progress forward in the tree, a high number of users quitting mid-lesson probably indicates that the skill is frustrating. It is frustrating if translations are wrong, the correct answers are overly particular about wording, the dictionary hints are wrong, the lesson references grammatical structures that have never been explained, etc., especially if the individual lessons are very long. While it is good for the courses to have material that is hard, it is bad for the lessons to be just frustrating.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew972936

Judit294350, I don't see why any part of learning a language needs to be hard. If you're finding a lesson hard it's probably because you are advancing too quickly and you need to go back and revise some of the earlier and 'easy' stuff. So contrary to what you said, you DO sometimes learn quite a bit by doing easy stuff you can already do. And there's a word for it, 'consolidation'. But anyway, I wish people wouldn't mix up language learning or any kind of academic learning with moral development and the dubious belief that doing 'hard' things makes us better people.

I suspect for most people, the point of learning a language is to be able to communicate with other people in that language, and also to take part in the culture, experience the literature, or maybe just for fun, rather than to 'be all they can be' and push themselves to the limit. No doubt there is a place for these things in life, but it's not in the language class.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

I prefer it when it's hard. Then, when it gets easier, I know I'm progressing, because it means I understand it.

In any case, every language has features that will be intrinsically hard for someone or other. (I don't know how far you've gotten with German, but for me, prepositions in particular are a Kopfschmerz. :D ) If something that is usually hard is coming easy, you're either learning very slowly, or you're gifted, or you've got some familiarity with that language or a similar language already. Plenty of people don't have any of these advantages (myself included).

Plus Judit never said that language-learning "has to be as hard as possible to create good character." She just said it should be difficult, as a challenge to a new learner. It's a means of cementing new concepts and checking their understanding of what they learned - I'm honestly not sure where you got the "moral development" bit from. Methinks you've read a bit far into it ...

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew972936

'I prefer it when its hard, then when it get easier I know I am progressing.' But this is my problem. What does it matter what you and Judit prefer? Why do so many people on here want to force their learning styles and philosophies on everyone else?

'The moral development' bit is not explicitly stated but is implicit in what has been said. It is also widespread in educational debates. It is present in those silly and annoying self-teaching books which don't provide translations to test sentences so that a learner can't 'cheat' by looking in the back. All this is rather pathetic. And the suggestion is that all people learn in the same way, or should be learning in the same way, have the same goals, and also that their learning should be 'hard', and if its not then they are being 'deceived' into thinking they are learning. And heaven forbid that 'they think they are learning'. Well, I think I know I am learning a language when I can understand different words, read a bit of a newspaper, or understand a bit of dialogue in a foreign film. I don't need a Duolingo quiz or anything else to tell me I am. And I think if I can do these things then I am clearly not being deceived by my language learning materials. Of course, I am not as good in any of the languages I am studying as I would like to be, but then language learning is surely a lifelong endeavour. And at least for me, it's not a race, so I don't care if I am doing it slowly.

As far as I'm concerned, learning slowly, learning quickly, or whatever the hell pace you want to learn at is OK. And maybe some people are happy only being able to recognise words so that they can read a book in their chosen language, and maybe other people have loftier ambitions. Who knows? Do you?

Peace

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

Yep, once again, well said. Multitudes use Duolingo and are continuing to and that in itself is an endorsement, right?!

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bagobones

ARCANA-MVSA the problem with your and Judiths claim is that you seem to be convinced that your way is the only and correct way. People are different and have different goals and ideas with learning the languages.

I started not knowing a word spanish, coming from Norwegian, English and Visayan.

I like the feeling of always have it easy and slowly add more to the easy stuff. That and trading my native Norwegian for Spanish with some Spanish teachers (highschool teachers), from different parts of the world to cover some of the different ways they speak Spanish has been very effective for me, and I have not to this day felt that anything is hard at all. It is just a lot, but nothing has been hard. But if I jump far down the course I will find it hard, but when I take it slow and slowly add new stuff to what I already know well and use it with my mentioned language partners after in conversations with them, it sticks for me. Nothing ever feels brain melting hard..

But that is MY way of learning. I am not claiming that it is right for you or anyone else, and I am not claiming that people need to do it that way, or else they are not learning, like Judith did..

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

Replying to myself because I can't reply to you.

Did you read my comment? Or just the first line?

I said that there are aspects of languages that are, and will always be, difficult to someone. It's inescapable. Particularly if the speaker's native language happens to be very different from the one they are learning, in which case the language itself may well be quite difficult for them. This is a general, well-known truth, not just an assumption based on my own experience.

And no, "work hard to build character" was not implied in Judit's post. Nor does the idea of it popping up often in debates about education automatically render it present. Having something be difficult is not meant to "build character," it's meant to provide a challenge and verify that one really knows what one learned. Fun fact: you're giving yourself a challenge every time you pick up a newspaper and read it in your target language. That's how you know you are learning. If that's not the point of it, then feel free to tell me what is.

No one said anything about learning style, speed, or anything else pertaining to personal learning techniques. I mentioned myself as an exception to the impression you gave me. Outside of that, you brought up the whole notion of anyone forcing their personal learning technique on anyone else - not me, and not Judit.

Peace.

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

I don't see why any part of learning a language needs to be hard. If you're finding a lesson hard it's probably because you are advancing too quickly and you need to go back and revise some of the earlier and 'easy' stuff.

You can revise the easy stuff as often as you want - but you won't get any further ahead than the easy stuff. Learning the same vocab over and over does not make vocab you have never come across understandable. Learning the indefinite tenses does not open up definite tenses - or when to use them.

Sticking to the easy stuff - which I did for a long time - consolidating - meant I could not communicate with people - because I did not have enough vocab or grammar.

And certainly no way I could "experience the literature" as I could not read books in Hungarian - in fact this is still a work in progress.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew972936

'You can revise the easy stuff as often as you want-but you won't get any further than the easy stuff'. Well, it depends on what you mean by further ahead. Going over the same stuff usually makes you better at that stuff. You can recall words more quickly and gain more fluency. Of course you're not learning anything 'new', but to me, this still counts as getting further ahead.

Judit, I'm not saying you are making this mistake but a lot of people confuse different things when talking about language learning and what it means to 'know' a language. People will often talk about fluency and mastering a language as if they are the same thing. They are not. You can be fluent in a language at a relatively low level and you can also master some very complex structures and only be able to express yourself very slowly and carefully. Which is the most useful? Well it depends on the individual's goals. I have known non-native English speakers who have lived in English speaking countries for many years and did not have very good command of the grammar, and would rely heavily on the present tense etc. Still they could function very well in most circumstances. People often forget that a lot of our language consists of the 'easy stuff'.

Compare a tabloid newspaper to a broadsheet. The tabloids contain much simpler language, and most of our day to day language is at this level. If you think I am exaggerating this, look at the language of our posts! How many conditionals are used? How many subjunctives? How many future perfects? And all the other obscure and difficult things that give us kopfschmerz when we are learning a language.

People have different goals and ambitions, and learn at different rates. Some like to study a lot and for long periods, some little and often. And some are just happy to do a bit every now and then. End of story. Sorry for the rant. Deus tecum

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

Well said Matthew. Comparing broadsheets to tabloids was to my mind a good analogy (!). All folks learn in different ways, at varying speeds & aptitudes, with differing goals & motivations (there's horses for courses, ha-ha). For me, I am happy that Duolingo exists as a free digital option for language-learners, with a high number of people around the globe that appreciate it!! Happy learning :)

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claara99

thx :-).

September 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

For me, getting past the red button is the hardest. After that, it's clearer sailing.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MTStroke

Yeah, you don't learn much doing typing. You already can type.

September 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

@SusanRankin1: You can just pause the app and put it in the background, and when you have time come back to it and resume learning in the middle of a lesson. Try that next time you're called into your appointment. EDIT: The article talks about "quitting skills," not lessons. This doesn't make much sense. How can you quit a skill without quitting the whole course?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew972936

ARCANA-MVSNA. I'm replying to this post because I can't respond to yours. You keep saying I'm reading things into your posts which aren't there and then you go on and reaffirm them. I provided quotes from yours and Judit's posts to show exactly what I take issue with. But I'll do it again for you. Judit's post is a criticism of Duolingo. And that's important in the context of our debate. (Remember my point about the self-teaching books and how they are designed so that people learn in the 'correct' manner?) Her post describes the fact that people might think they are learning when they are not as a 'PROBLEM'. Read her post. Why is it a problem? Maybe it's a problem for her. Fine. But then maybe she should just say that! Like I tried to make clear in my previous post, it's not a problem for me. I don't worry about how much I am learning. I just carry on. But then that's just me!

You said, "You're giving yourself a challenge every time you pick up a newspaper and read it in your target language. That's how you know you are learning. If that's not the point of it, then feel free to tell me what is". Fun fact. I usually read newspapers, even ones in foreign languages for the news and, yes, to practice my languages, NOT for a challenge! If it were too much of a challenge I'd probably put it down and read something easier. But then this is just me. And if that's different from you then that just shows that people often have different goals and motivations. When you read a newspaper in your own language is it a great challenge or is it easy? If it's easy does that suggest you don't know the language, or that you do? I suspect the latter.

True, there are aspects of a language that can be difficult. Learning any language as an adult is surely a difficult task, but if you are finding certain aspects of language learning easy does that mean that you are not learning? NO. You don't always need to be challenged to know that you know something.

I'm interested, did you actually read my posts? If you did it seemed to escape your attention that the whole point of them is to challenge people who want to assert unfounded 'truths' and assumptions about language learning and language learners. Unlike you and J, I don't want to assert ANYTHING about any other learner. You don't know what works for me. You don't know why I am learning languages, or why I want to learn the ones I am. And you probably don't know any of these things about anyone else on here. And that's that!

This is just my humble opinion, but I think really these forums should be a place for people to give each other encouragement and ask each other questions about the languages they are learning. They shouldn't be a place for third rate learning psychology philosophisers!

PS, despite all this, I've given your posts an uprating and a lingot because they are interesting and I actually suspect that there is probably more agreement between us than anyone would guess from our posts!

Love and peace again!

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

That tells me you're still reading into them, even just a little. Difficulty has nothing to do with "building character," so I'm still not sure where that came from. And I would like to point out that in trying not to make assumptions of others, you have actually made a couple of your own: 1) that everyone provides themselves a check on progress like you do, reading a newspaper or otherwise; and 2) that everyone uses a learning system like it says it's supposed to be used. We're talking about people here; they'll use whatever they need however they see fit. That includes Duolingo. And the developers of those courses are also aware of this; that's why their methods are almost always just recommended. ;)

And something can be easy, of course; what I'm worried about is when something is too easy (and no, I'm not talking about new material). When that becomes the case, maybe it's time for something a bit harder. (Unless, of course, you've reached the level you're trying to attain, but for many of us Duo users, this is not the case.) No character-building is required.

No, I don't know those things about you or anyone else - nor you about me. But I also know that Duo's aim is to teach a language largely regardless of one's reasons for learning it (I say largely because settings are a thing, however limited they may be); for one seeking to read a book in their target language, there's nothing wrong with also learning how the language sounds and how to spell it. It's extra, sure, but they're still attaining their original goal, aren't they?

By the way, *you can use asterisks like this* to create italics like this. :)

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew972936

I'll try to make this response brief. You keep going on about the 'building character' remark but really that was a minor point in my first post, and I've moved on since then. And I never claimed that everyone provides a check on their progress like I do, or that everyone uses a learning system like it's supposed to be used. So I really don't know where you got that from. So if you want to talk about reading things into other people's posts, I think you are guilty there too! And no, there's absolutely nothing wrong with learning a little extra.

So there you go! Like I said in my previous post, we probably agree a lot more than you realise!

And thanks for the italics tip

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

Once again replying to myself because I can't reply to you.

Now, having slept on the issue a bit, methinks I've gotten my thoughts together a bit better. :)

I think you and I are looking at the issue from completely different perspectives. You're looking at it from the exact opposite of what I call "Planet of the Hats" - your whole argument is that everyone is different, so different, in fact, that one cannot predict anything about them; but I'm looking at it more in terms of patterns in an overall group, not lone individuals.

My point is that individuals are different, sure, but that doesn't change the fact that patterns and trends exist in large groups - like a userbase. Sure, I couldn't predict your exact reasons for learning a language, but with the right data (aside from what you gave me already), I certainly could make an educated guess. ;)

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

Hey! Thanks A-M for the italics tip :)

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

When I first started DL, I used to write long blocks of texts. Problem is, I've had to stop reading any discussions in which more than 20 people have commented. Think about it: Why not just stick to sharing grammar and syntax information? It's more considerate to everybody. Occasionally, I'm inconsiderate, too, when I write comments like this. ;^)

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew972936

Linda, if that post is addressed to me, I totally agree with you! My original post was a simple 2 paragraph criticism of a largely pointless and patronising post. Unfortunately this incited more irrelevant responses. I said in one of my more rambling posts exactly what you just said. It would be better if these forums only contained mutual encouragement and questions/points about languages.

However, as you have just admitted, you and jabbathehut have also cluttered the forum with useless posts, which kind of undermines your point!

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sphinx1824

I think it means leaving the lesson mid-lesson. Calling it "people who stop mid-lesson at any point in the skill" is a bit of a mouthful.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthew972936

ARCANA-MVSNA I'm replying to this post because I can't reply to yours again.

This will probably be my last post. I don't want to take up any more of your precious time than is necessary because I think you would really prefer to spend it fighting against 'straw men' To be honest I'm not even sure if your post is addressed to me because you seemed to have veered so far off topic that it is a little difficult to tell, but I will try to focus your mind again.

Judit's two original posts said two things which I took issue with, (similar things have been restated in this forum ad nauseam, and I'm not going to respond to them all individually because life is short, and they are just wrong!) you then seemed to take issue with me taking issue with them.

In one of her posts, Judit said this, "The problem is some people think they are learning because they can recognize a word (from a very small pool of words)." It could just be a personality kink of mine, but I think this is a little patronising. And that was part of the issue for me. The implication is that Judit knows people can't be learning by simply recognising words, and although she has seen this, she doesn't think other people will have figured it out for themselves. Instead they "will think they are learning". I told you how, in my case, I generally know I am not being deceived by my language learning materials when I can do practical things with the a language I am learning, e.g. read a newspaper, write a few sentences, understand bits of dialogue etc. Now I want to emphasise that this is just my case, but unlike you and Judit, I usually credit people with enough intelligence to do the same, unless I have knowledge to the contrary.

Second, you and Judit also seem to take issue with any kind of learning which isn't 'challenging'. If a person isn't being challenged you believe, they can't possibly be learning anything, at least, nothing of value. I also take issue with this claim because it is simply false. I pointed out that most of the language we use is actually fairly basic, and suggested that some people may be happy learning and improving their fluency in a language at this level, without trying to master the more complicated C1-C2 level stuff. This is just my opinion, but I believe that this is not a silly thing to do and that it is often undervalued!

Now I want to respond to your most recent post. I never said anything in my posts to suggest that people are so different that we can't see patterns or trends. This would be a bizarre claim. All human beings share similar biology. We have similar brains, similar sensory equipment, abilities, and capacities. In fact, I think the differences are usually over stressed by people! So again, you have just read something into my posts that wasn't there. However, I do think it is a fallacy to establish trends and patterns from looking at lots of data collected about individuals, and then to try to use these patterns and trends to establish definite facts about any given individual. This is a common way of thinking, and no doubt many psychologists and sociologists believe they can do it, but it is erroneous nonetheless!

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

When I write 6 paragraphs, I've usually explained several grammar rules in both languages. Not to say that you are the only offender; I wrote exactly the same way when I started DL. Then, someone who disagreed with me posted that I was a troll! I was horrified, but I realized that he disagreed with a point that I had based a premise on. Since I always research any grammar points, I decided never to get off-track again, although I'm breaking my own rule here. The point is, and I make it respectfully, I'm looking for grammar tips here, not editorials, no matter how much I might agree with the latter.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jabbathehut07

who on earth would go through the trouble reading all of that? how could a discussion on duo lingo, mind you, be, that long. tell me. cries out in terrible anguish PLEASE! ahhhh..... LOL to much drama....

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

Someone voted you down so I voted you up because I agree with you. Because you might get downvoted again, I'm giving you two lingots.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gergana_Vaseva

Duolingo is an app that really helped me a lot to develop consistency in everything I do. Not only that I'm learning a new language (something that I thought I wasn't able to do because the Bulgarian educational system is very "helpful" and "functional" when it comes to opportunities and choices), but I'm also looking forward to continue with it and improve my English and Swedish skills. I'm really glad for what I've done in the past year and I think it's mostly because of this app. Yes, it's not perfect and yes, it's not really tracking "how well, how easily, or how quickly people learn a language - only their engagement", but it's a start to do something more if you want to.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

I'm really pleased for you Gergana - that Duolingo has enabled you to learn (and continue to learn :) new languages. All credit to you and to Duo :)

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllaMcC

I think this is a great comment. Duolingo isn't going to teach everything you need, but it will give a strong start and from Duo, we can all branch out. I learned enough German to be able to communicate in Germany for a year here (though I also took college courses in it years ago & made sure to speak German to people for a year before I left.) So Duo is a great adjunct or starter. A terrific place also to find out if, perhaps, a certain language isn't for me too.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kuniklulo

Interesting entry, but it's a shame to have to wait so long for the incubator to answer...

PS. Is there any email address to which you can attach language skills confirmations when someone is applying to contribute? ;)

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

There's a link somewhere on the DL app. You have to search for it.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miaou-meow

i'm very grateful for everything duo's team does. it's truly incredible ♡ i wish all education system everywhere were as awesome as your creation. what you do is ineffable. looking forward to seeing and being a part of duo's future ♡

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanRankin1

It's great to find out how it works! Thanks!

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LingualLightning

An interesting look into the process of making a Duolingo course. Thanks for sharing!

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

Yes, I second that :)

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsaackOuma

i third it

September 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ISpeakAlien

Interesting.

I made a survey for users about the Incubator and its application process, if anyone's interested.

https://forms.gle/DhAt1J2mhrUnV3DG6

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cartergraysons

Thanks for the survey link!! I just filled it out!!

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ISpeakAlien

Thanks for filling out the survey! I will send the results to Duolingo after it gets at least 30 responses.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

How many responses have you had so far? Perhaps if you asked people to upvote you after replying to your survey, additional people would also be willing to take your survey. It can be very risky to click on unknown links.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WCGB
  • 436

Filled 'er out! Great survey!

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChevyBarnes05

When do we get this filter? Is this something that we will actually have available in our trees?

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sphinx1824

It looks like the feature is just for course creators.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChevyBarnes05

Oh okay, I thought that we'd be able to view it in our trees. I mean, that's awesome to know how courses will be made from now on!

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyle-Crane

Wow

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachyllMah

It would be great if you had some kind of grammar course too! I have trouble with grammar in Spanish, so it would be very cool.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Rachy, try studyspanish.com. I sometimes use it with my students to drive home a point presented in their textbooks. The introductory level is free, which provides all the grammar explanations and a few exercises and tests. If you want more of the latter, you can upgrade.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

Stay away from rambling forums like these, except for rare occasions. By that, I mean open a forum only if you have a specific language question, and write only about that.

Also, downvote useless comments so that it doesn't take forever to find the truly helpful comments. Usually, I won't open a forum if it has too many comments in it. I don't do this until I have exhausted all other means of finding the answers to my language questions. Keywords just suggest themselves.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

For specific language topics, first use the search feature, or better, google it! Include the phrase, "in Duolingo forums." If you don't find your answer, post in the forum specific to that language, rather than here in the general forum.

I hate to be merciless in downvoting useless comments, but you are right Linda, users like you are helping other users to not waste their time. Here's a lingot for helping me save time! =D

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

Have you used the website? There you can access grammar tips and notes.

October 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChuckD_1

Great idea Rachyll! Grammar can be such a pain. But lack of grammar hurts worse LOL. And Spanish learners need it badly because outside of Spain, most Spanish speakers are subliterate in Spanish(!) Not to mention all the regional variations of the spoken language. For those reasons, it should be formal grammar from Spain. But on Duolingo? They would have to 1) gamify it, and 2) monetize it. I doubt we'll ever see it here :(

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

"outside of Spain, most Spanish speakers are subliterate in Spanish(!)"

Chuck D, this statement is both incorrect and very offensive. Spanish has developed differently as it spread through the world. The only big difference in grammar is the way "you" is treated. Castilian Spanish still has "vosotros," the plural form of the familiar "tu." In Central America ustedes is used for both the familiar and formal plural. In South America they not only don't use "vosotros," but they also have a different word for , which is vos. All the verb conjugations for vos are different than for tú. So while you will have learned that in most other countries one says tú eres, you will learn that in Argentina one must say, vos sos. Besides that, the differences are mainly lexical.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon275517

Thank you, jairapetyan.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

Au contraire! If you go the RAE website, you can look up answers to grammar questions easily.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lightning_11

Sounds cool!

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunshine_9687

Oh Hi Lightning_11

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiegeDeLang

Dekujeme! We thank you!

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmmaH883755

Very interesting blog post! Thank you!

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr_Rock31415

Great! Has anyone else done the Technology section in the French course. I found it very painful to get through. I think a lot of acceptable answers weren’t accepted. Anyone els?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShellMarg

Yes I have done the Technology section in the French course. If you think your answer is correct please submit a report and indicate so. You can find this opportunity at the bottom of the screen. It is of great help to Duo and they do review this type of input and add correct options.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

Well said. I have rarely seen this point made so well and tersely.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephVM08

Great read! Very inspiring to still see Duolingo still putting so much effort into modifying courses. Hoping to be able to contribute as well next summer. ;)

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

Yes, I agree Joseph that Duo deserves full credit for that :)

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cerydwyn1

One big thing missing from their courses is the ability to pick what format you are learning in a lesson, so for example, my strengths in language learning are reading and writing but not listening or speaking. So I need to do more practice in the latter. It would be great if I could choose a whole lesson of listening and answering questions, such as “type what you have just heard” or hear is a sentence in English, now type the german” or a speaking lesson like “listen to the English and say it in German.” The sam goes for picking whole lessons in reading and writing.

It would also be useful of the app had the option of giving practice sessions without penalties so that you don’t have to log into the internet site to do so.

Downloadable offline lessons would also be a very welcome improvement.

On another note, as a Brit, I learned basic EUROPEAN Spanish in school but cannot learn more due to Hispanic being different enough that “reprogramming what I know “ is a pain. I would love the original form of Spanish to be available. Surely a few tweaks in programming could allow this?

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon275517

Cerydwyn1, I’m guessing by “Hispanic” you mean Spanish as spoken in the Americas.

It’s interesting to me that you feel you can’t manage with the Spanish of the Americas as taught on Duolingo. In contrast, I learned all my Spanish on Duolingo but found it relatively easy to pick up the differences for the Spanish as spoken in Spain.

What do you find so painful?

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

I am a Plus subscriber on Duolingo. Downloadable lessons is one of its benefits. I tired of and was frustrated by the ads in the mobile app.

As for a few tweaks in Spanish? It would take more than a few. Besides that, of nearly 580 million speakers worldwide, there are 48 million in Spain.

October 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChuckD_1

If Duolingo doesn't teach "the original form of Spanish" then what in heaven's name does it teach? I have no interest in learning any LATAM version, I want the real thing. And what do you mean by "Hispanic?"

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon275517

ChuckD_1, do you think people speaking English in the United States aren’t speaking “real” English? I think we (USAian here) are speaking real English, just as valid as the English spoken in England.

Similarly the Spanish spoken in Latin America is just as real and valid as the Spanish spoken in Spain.

The country with the largest number of Spanish speakers in the world is Mexico, not Spain.

You may have cultural reasons for why the Spanish of Spain is of most interest to you, just as I have cultural reasons for why the Spanish of Argentina is of most interest to me. But both languages are equally valid and real and worth learning. (The Spanish of Argentina is not exactly taught on Duolingo, so I use other resources to pick up the extra bits I want to know.)

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChuckD_1

Yes Sharon, I do believe many people in the US are speaking a degraded form of English, so I'm happy to call myself an equal opportunity (cultural) bigot. But can anyone answer my actual question? What Spanish does Duolingo claim to teach?

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon275517

Well OK, glad to recognize someone who recognizes his own equal-opportunity biases.

Duolingo teaches Spanish of the Americas broadly speaking, more specifically of Mexico I think, but with (I have heard it said) a Puerto Rican accent.

(In later lessons the vosotros forms appear, but they’re not a major focus.)

Learning it will make you a perfectly adequate communicator in Spanish, but certainly if you prefer to be immersed in Spanish of Spain pronunciation and word choices then it will be less than satisfactory.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChuckD_1

p.s. Mexican Spanish would be just fine were I living in the American southwest or spending lots of time there. After all, Mexicans used to own it before our government stole it from them.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon275517

May I ask, are you in Europe? I can understand that Spanish of Spain would be the prestige form there. People would certainly understand you if you spoke a different version, but I know there are other factors at play than simply understanding.

I don’t live anywhere near Argentina, but I dance Argentine tango, so I have a sentimental attachment to that version, and happily carry my “ll and y pronounced as sh” and “vos” and “de donde sois?” into all Spanish-speaking environments.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sharon275517

P.S. yes, to the theft of the Southwest, and Hawaii, and... stop me before I go on a rant about how terrible people are. Going back a long way.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

DL is a company founded and registered in the U. S. Why on earth would a New World company want to teach a language that is spoken on the other side of the ocean? I have often heard it said that there is no one dialect of English that is superior to all of the other dialects spoken in other parts of the world. (Except of course for the occasional Britisher who insists that he speaks the King's English, and all others are vulgar dialects, just as Italian, French, Spanish, and even English are vulgar dialects of Latin.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graham8020

I think it is fantastic that you are using tools to improve your courses. But, do these tools consider the learner?
I was an adult education teacher for well over 20 years and while everyone has their own learning styles, creating learning content is much more difficult than your metrics suggest. One thing that is common to content that is learned is that the learner can recall and use the learned content on their own. If they can't do this they haven't learned it. However, to attain mastery of learning, repetition is required and the more repetition the better. Reducing the number of lessons as suggested by the metrics is actually a backward step in my opinion. If anything, more lessons teaching the same content for that lesson sequence is much better for the learner in the long run. The process of learning cannot be rushed. Sure some learners aquire learning content quicker than others but most learners are disadvantaged by fast learning. As a long time martial artist, I'm constantly astounded that some beginners expect to be able to master the art of self defence after a couple of lessons. Sure, you can learn to punch is a lesson or two, but to master that punch, might take years of training, many lessons over and over and a lot of repetition of the basics. I would never want to be punched even once by someone who has done years of training, but a beginner - meh! Please, Duolingo, use your metrics by all means but please don't cut the number of lessons. The 4, 4, 8, 12, 20 format was really, really good for learners. (and me!)

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

I agree that repetition and practicing is key, but

Reducing the number of lessons as suggested by the metrics is actually a backward step in my opinion. If anything, more lessons teaching the same content for that lesson sequence is much better for the learner in the long run.

I think I will deal with this by using the "Practice" key more frequently. This will ensure the repetition I need, in the sequence the algorithm finds suitable, which means, for me: Random, which is good because it resembles actual language use.

I think doing the lessons of "Food 1" 24 times while knowing that you are doing "Food 1" is not as effective as being confronted with a lesson from "Food 1" 24 times at weird intervals when you don't expect it.

This is also part of the martial arts. ;-)

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllaMcC

Yes, I don't understand why we aren't given manzanas during school or people lessons. These lessons should be building on each other, not just teaching something and leaving it forever.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

As an adult, I have studied Spanish off and on for several years with little success. I'm not talented at learning languages, given that I had seven years of Spanish when I was in school yet still couldn't spell or write complicated Spanish sentences.

Since the metric system was introduced, I have made prodigious leaps and bounds in a few short months. Today, for the first time ever, I successfully spoke Spanish in a conversation that lasted for five minutes, and I understood most of what I heard. DL is the only thing that ever worked for me.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Inspiring! Thanks for sharing! One very good way to boost DL's effectiveness is by simply repeating out loud every sentence after you do it. This is because speaking involves muscle memory. I sometimes have to remind myself to do this.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/merkavar

Are they saying there are skills that go from a1 to c1?

Or is that just some future proofing of the metrics and only up to a2 exist?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

They clearly say the courses only cover A1-A2 content. However, in their tree filter apparently they have some vocabulary that is considered C level. Or maybe they just put that there, in case it ever happens. Spanish is one of the better-developed trees, and the vocab really doesn't go beyond B2.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamie506338

Wow, 8 languages at significant levels! Do you feel like you can understand them at a B1/B2 level? And how to you remember them all? Any secrets?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Jamie, with a week of immersion I could probably get any of those level 25 languages to B1, those that aren't already there or higher. I made the mistake of learning Swedish and Portuguese on "silent mode." I did the DL sentence translations but rarely vocalized them. As a result I can read them but not speak them. I'd recommend always repeating Duolingo's sentences out loud as you work on them, so you activate your muscle memory. And no, unfortunately I don't remember them all. Swedish in particular. I should go back and review, take my tree to a higher level. But I'd also like to work on Korean, Hebrew, Chinese and Japanese... there simply isn't time.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaSsGaz

"in their tree filter apparently they have some vocabulary that is considered C level" Where ? In the Vocab CEFR Level, the tree only has 3 A1 lessons, 1 A2 and 2 B1. There are no C+ lessons.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaSaidZakaria

cool!

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia177448

Sounds useful!

I wonder if a filter for the rate of incorrect sentences at level four might also be useful. It could show the developers which skills might be too difficult or on which topics/grammar features might be useful for learners (in the way that the new(ish) Spanish tree introduced more skills to practice sentences with "gustar" and similar verbs).

(Copied from another post on the same topic because I think developers might be more likely to see it here (just in case it's something they might want to consider.))

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

I'm guessing that this is already being worked on.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

Learning path is a personal decision. Duolingo balances between two forces. Learning and gaming. It is a very difficult balance. The learning scores are not measured so good. I have had a lot of progress in German for instance, but o cannot master difficult issues as it is adjectives and prepositions. I am not good at all all and o feel frustrated. I am thinking of quitting the course. How should I stay motivated? My metrics show many XPs and crowns, but it is a fake image.

About abandon: Fast progress is not real in the leaderboard system. Most likely there are cheaters. I would like to be more Stories, more speech production as it is exercise like making some phrases. It is important to speak with someone so a chat room is necessary.

About typing. It is so common to use Gboard or similar to write, do it should be not be possible to use it. Almost all Level 3 can be used by voice typing. No! The temptation is too strong! No, definitely not!

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AroounMara

I prefer the word bank rather than a lot of tying. The risk of carpal tunnel syndrome is real.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tae-Face

I think Duolingo can be benefit from adding aspects of past lessons to the ongoing ones. While learning about “school”, you’ll see the words teacher or student a lot and rightfully so. Why not also see the previously learned words car, drink, shirt, brother, etc.

The teacher has 4 students

The teacher uses a yellow car

The students drink water in class

Maybe retention can improve with methods like these.

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Some courses, such as Hungarian, do this. I think it is a good idea. But guess what? Some people complain there are numbers or colours in the school skill :-(

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biocin1

SUGGESTION: I would love to see a section added where +++the computer speaks a WORD (in whatever language) {NO PRINTING/pictures ON THE SCREEN}...then we must reply with that word in our native/original language+++ no word on screen/ hints. We must use our EARS to hear(as slow as necessary; as we now do) and we must translate and speak the word(s)...am I making sense here? It can be used for small phrases, but words only...I get no practice saying these words without reading them first. I do not feel as if I can understand words in a real life situation....Thanks for ‘listening!

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deniscalmo1

i always improve my english, 'cause is better has two languaje, even i speak spanish. i'm learning english to have a better job got it?

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Petroc2

Recognition is just as important as recall, all fluent speakers began by listening first then speaking. That is perhaps one of the failings of a type based method. Listen and repeat occurs in several languages, and as long as the person isn’t demotivated by getting it “wrong” its a good learning tool. Listen and choose which word it was is OK too.

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrekus1

Duo is epic

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaomiGrace401539

I think your courses are fine! Great actually!

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varkentje123

"The Tree Filter was one of the most-used course creator tools for tree development and revision." It's a new and exciting toy to play with. ;) But to be honest, it does sound good! Nicely done.

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexWilkin848933

I wish the lesson descriptions for each skill were more detailed and covered all topics related to the lesson. For example, I am progressing through Spanish and have tested out of lessons but can’t go back to read more details (specifically reflexsive verbs) or if I’m learning a new section I’d appreciate an over view of vocabulary and skills to be learned in the lesson.

September 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MonikaEggers

That would be good

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fireftrbuck

I can agree with some of the comments below, but Duolingo is by far the best thing I’ve used so far to learn French. I am curious if it’s possible to have an option to create my own flash cards? I noticed the online version has a words list that I go over, but it would be nice (as the amount of words is mounting) to hand pick the ones I need to go over instead of revisiting an entire section.

September 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gh0stwheel

I am curious if it’s possible to have an option to create my own flash cards?

You can do so on Tinycards.
Or choose from flashcard decks that were created by Duolingo:

September 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M3XwF1

Would it help anyone else to be able to choose options that select the format for learning---for example to just have typing and voice without the fill-in-the blanks or the "cute" little green cheerleader constantly telling you you're learning? Those 2 things irritate me, and leave me avoiding Duolingo more because I really want to learn and those things don't help me at all.

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

You can turn the cheerleade of in settings.

October 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UitoriCoru

I would love to see

More practical sentences that can be used in conversation less abstract ones Wish the app had the lessons light bulb that the web does. I engage online more now so that I can learn the language rather than be thrown into it Expanding on that it would be cool if both the web and app would interject the learning as you or if you fail a point often enough or maybe bonus lessons on your weak points I find that Duolingo has help make a rather phenomenal reader in my target languages but I still struggle to finds the words to say what I wanna say.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

What is "practical" will depend on each person. Sentences I have had to say:

"Respected Landlord, my toilet is blocked. Please organize a plumber to come to the flat and fix it."

"The saleswoman at the newspaper shop is unable to load any money onto my phone."

"Are the horse carriages available for non-participants?"

The sort of thing I have had to understand:

"The cost of rubbish disposal and heating is pro rataed over the whole year."

"When you hone the blade of a scythe, stroke it don't bang it."

"Madame, in order for us to process your application, you are required to demonstrate native facility with the Hungarian language." (This one went over my head as the bureaucrat intended.)

My point is, you cannot double guess what vocab will be needed by anyone. Stuff a solid couple of thousand words in and give people the tools to grow with their ability to use the language. Memorizing sentences limits your ability to speak.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nardoel

Uitoricoru, I totally share the views you express. Far too many of duo's sentences are just absurd. But once in a while, there is a natural sentence which illustrates perfectly a natural way of saying something. There is one feature I would like to have : being able to flag a sentence as a favorite and to be able to find it in a list of preferred sentences which I could consult subsequently.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nardoel

Come on, UitoriCoru is right. It's not that hard to find simple sentences which are both commonly used and very much in the spirit of the language, AND illustrate a grammatical point or introduce useful vocabulary. I'd say far too many of duolingo's sentences hardly make any sense at all and it is very hard to imagine a context where they could be uttered by a native speaker. And memorizing easy (archetypical) sentences enhance one's ability to speak. Because we learn by acquiring patterns and reproducing and doing variations on them. And you don't have to actively memorize them, the simple fact of being exposed to many such sentences allows you to acquire a sense of the language. Whereas being exposed to artificial sentences which nobody would ever pronounce doesn't help. Nobody wants to speak like duo.

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RebekahMays

Interesting!

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1GermanJoe

The progress test should be more suited based on what we get right and what we get wrong in my opinion.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RenzoGama

Excellent!

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biocin1

Input here for you....I’m a 36 day old student. I get more positive/challenged vibes when being introduced to new words. Then I totally enjoy learning ‘how to use’ the new words. When you give me the same material that I have been successful with; then I get bored. I do read what happened when I get RED’ed....but I usually get caught for Spelling or my hand shook over the keyboard (ya gotta move the CHECK tab lower or up high!) it’s right next to the backspace....****oops, I did it again! I know that one mistake can change a sentence or a phrase, but eventually I do get it into my brain what you’re trying to show me. But repeating the same sentence over and over after I’ve already learned it is non-productive. Our ‘Owlet’ provides a bit of laughter and a pick up when needed... GOOD STUFF!

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nita449392

Fascinating -not that I understand the filters that well. However giving you 4 lingots for a job well done and well explained (& you really deserve far more than that!!) . Duo as an E-learning platform is clearly devised well & deserves full credit, as far as I'm concerned. Me encanto la Espanol!

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CutieLearner

Cool!

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoOneIsOrigami

This is my sis, CutieLearner!!! She is really cute. I gave her 10 lingots because I love her so much!

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PyroNewman

Will the incubator still be in use aftrr this or will it get replaced?

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rs1954

how about clearing up the bugs first before going into unchartered waters?

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

I generally don't encounter bugs in my language courses.

Sometimes I see posts in the forum about the SW behaving unexpectedly; I then recommend sending a bug Report.

Because I believe these are individual occurrences that have to be solved on a case by case basis; parallel to new developments.

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

Correcting then updating vocabulary and grammar errors are being done. Some take a while, and some seem to go a whole year before they are being fixed. Kind of frustrating at times.

In the Korean from English, that team moderates and responds to our request within the course (Thanks Ash-Fred!). So I know they read and respond to our course feedback. It has improved a lot. But they lost a team member in the past month. Hoping they get someone quick.

Bugs, however, is a term related to software programming problems. So I’m thinking that wasn’t what you were commenting on.

October 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlazingfuryKing

I really want to work at Duolingo as it has helped me for my overseas trip. However I am minor and I don't think I can work at my age

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

We all feel that way, honey.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaswataG

I want to contribute to English-Bengali language course. How can I do that?

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

go to website. look for “contributors in discussion or at bottom of website page.

October 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ccf-Uk_2018

Nice! Thanks for writing this!

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ccf-Uk_2018

Aww, having read it I was hoping it was an update to the incubator to make it easier to learn and use, which means it's easier to make a course. But it's still pretty cool! Thanks for making the blog post! Hope we get to see more soon! :D

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZPScqw86

ßæñš

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AidenCabrera2005

I think that you guys should expand the shop a lot more and it will encourage people to do more lessons in dulingo!:)

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ManuelPapi1

I look forward dedicating even more time to learning!

September 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/banjopickinbubba

Does this mean you will join me on the dark side of the lingot?

September 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saschelsa

I like Duo. At first, I started with Babbel to learn polish and the little con with Babbel, you have to pay. Thank you Duo!

September 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bastiankai

nice, thank you

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olivova

cool!

September 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LoganPerry16

nice

September 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saschelsa

I wanna be polyglot and I need a 6th language, the 6th language will be Spanish the next year.

September 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamHunter20

Great goal. So you can already have normal conversations with natives in five other languages? Well done. What languages?

September 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/big_boi_toes

dulingo bird will find you.

September 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seveneleve5

Wow! Thanks!

September 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JegHeterLee

Hi, Not sure where to get support. I am logged in and synced on my laptop and Android mobile device. I used to do lessons on my laptop, then go to the mobile to get my daily lingots. Lately, they aren't talking to one another. I have 1017 lingots when I'm logged in to Duo on my laptop, but 400 or so on the mobile. Same username. What am I doing wrong?

September 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaideeAlls

well if you could explain it better maybe i could help you

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

Probably best to post to the Troubleshooting discussion. Also do a discussion search on the web forums for FAQ or Known problems.

i also use phone or ipad, and thought I had same experience, but I never looked for an answer. I do now try to make sure I sign out of Duolingo on either one before I login on the other. Just me guessing that maybe they were not synched up to Duolingo. Also keep in mind that you wont get a sync if you were in either but offline. You must be on internet, mobile or browser, for that.

edit...Also make sure you are talking lingots or XP, because the XPs are posted differently on mobile versus website (this week, this month, all times).

End of my response...Please post to support discussions if this continues.

October 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dpatkat

As a longtime student on Duolingo, I wondered how the chaos was used to keep the courses on the path to improvement without collapsing.

The larger pool of data from the larger set of students who are on the more popular (or more populated) languages I am guessing makes it easier to spot what works and what doesn’t. It was interesting to read that abandonment was recognized as a signal of possible problems rather than just some students jumping away. A few times I backed away because a few seemed so broken, then on resuming I saw many improvements. People may not believe it but Spanish from English had a much to fix years ago. Grateful for it now being an example of Duolingo’s ongoing successes.

(One improvement I want is abandonment of romanization wherever possible.)

Thank you, DarthDuo and M Misirpashayeva.

October 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YukiTraveler

Hi there, first time on Duolingo desktop version (didn't realize it has a forum). I just want to see how my profile looks like besides my username in a comment (the flags with numbers). Couldn't find this in my profile. Suggestion: Perhaps show these stats in the profile (I want to know the numbers behind the flags).

October 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexus_Dreemurr

I has been good boi. Someone pls gib me lingots :)

September 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaSni12

Oooooooooooooo9oooooooooooooooooooooooooooofffffffffffffrfffffff fffffffffffffff

October 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joemamma20

https://grabify.link/S8C5YV

October 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valya600955

I'd like to ask why there still is no course in Bulgarian

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jordan571880

Love the picture of Duo

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YahyaSaidZakaria

Cool!

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolyglotDK

Lol

September 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/THE_6TH_HOKAGE

what

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaideeAlls

hhhhhaaaaahhhhhaaa lmao

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.S.P.C

Would it be possible if you could add something like "How was your day? Ready for some training?" in the notifications. Is just that Duo is the only message I get on my phone. Pls :)

September 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AvaKnight12

that's interesting

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jennifer212226

Ola tudo bem!

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaetlinEMM

pe

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.KingCub

Ich bin so schnell wie blöd

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.KingCub

Kachowski

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColtonHair

Hi Thatchy

September 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaseyMaxey1

Can someone please donate some LINGOTS to me

September 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaomiGrace401539

follow me i'm Naomi Grace thank you

September 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaideeAlls

wtf

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaomiGrace401539

yeet i luv this thing duo keep it up

September 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielRac4

Level check

September 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitor983392

We need sign languages :(

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

That is done on TinyCards.

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CormacH4

not bhed

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukasChleb

:-)

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yoshiru1

Thou has mucho pickles

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsabellaB576658

hi

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dogomolo

hello

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abbiewhiley

hi

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarnieRodriguez

Hi

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaideeAlls

this isnt a chatting station. use snapchat for that dont take up space in this when it could be used for people who actually need help . thank you

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The9

Yay, something else we didn't ask for while keeping ignoring what people actually ask for

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

It is just not true that Duolingo staff / contributors "keep ignoring" what people actually ask for.

1) In my 26 months of membership, several language courses have been added that were requested in the forum,

2) The crown system has been improved in ways that were suggested in the forum (color codes for the crown levels almost immediately after being suggested; spaced repetition)

And there are certainly other instances that I just can't think of right now.

Also, please bear in mind that those who state their opinions in the forums are a tiny minority of the Duolingo users. Nobody knows what the huge majority of non-forum users think and want. The data that we provide by our decisions and errors while using Duolingo provide that info. It's great to know that Duolingo uses this info to improve our learning experience -- even if nobody asked for that specific improvement on the forum, just because we are only experts in ourselves, not in language didactics. ;-)

(This is to explain my downvote)

Happy learning! :-)

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sphinx1824

How is a tool to help make courses better something nobody wants? Maybe nobody has been directly asking for it, but this sounds like something that would be almost entirely beneficial. And it seems like there's always posts with people asking for the courses to be improved.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaideeAlls

i agree with you man .

October 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JavierUgal8

,fscehcnjman cbhmJABghnj

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave553700

Help. I am trying to learn Spanish for business. Do you have a module that covers basic numbers, say 1 to 1000? Also I am looking for a module that covers basic business conversation such as what is your phone number and can I have your business card. Can I find such modules already?

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda_from_NJ

No

September 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyleChin6

Can you add Cantonese

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peZ5YY

YEEaaaahhhh okkkkkk

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JavierUgal8

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JavierUgal8

aahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuhekoNiko

hi

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelShup2

Hi

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LIL-TK

boi

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Curry_12

hi

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xDankMemeDanx

fortnite

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KonigderSprachen

Nicht notwendig.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cartergraysons

Engagieren Sie sie nicht weiter.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColtonHair

nice

September 19, 2019
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